Good news about energy

Posted on Wednesday, June 23rd, 02010 by Kirk Citron
link Categories: Long News   chat 0 Comments

The Long News: stories that might still matter fifty, or a hundred, or ten thousand years from now.

It’s obvious energy will be one of the great challenges of this century. But it’s possible to hope that the current BP oil spill might help prompt a broader conversation about possible alternatives.

Over the past few weeks we’ve been looking for stories about the future of energy, running a News Hunt with the help of social news site NewsTrust.

There was good news on many fronts – we found a lot of high quality journalism; we had great participation from a large number of NewsTrust and Long Now Foundation members, bringing in news sources from around the world; and finally, there was a surprising amount of good news in the news stories themselves, as you’ll read below.

To quote Alexander Rose: “Looking back over what came out of the Energy News Hunt I found that I learned not only more about energy, but a lot more about the way it is covered by the press. I am reminded how rare it is to see a story that contextualizes new energy technology in the overall picture. Crowd-sourcing is a tricky and nuanced business. NewsTrust did a great job framing and directing the efforts of its contributors to yield high quality stories.”

For an excellent summary of everything we learned, visit the NewsTrust blog here.

For a quick overview, here are some of the best recent news stories we found about the future of energy:

1. Solar: Here comes the sun

European dream of desert energy takes shape

The rise of big solar: growing pains

2. Wind: The answer, my friend

How Texas lassoed the wind

Bottled wind could be as constant as coal

3. Nuclear: The news on nukes

The future of nuclear power

The nuclear option is back on the table

4. Geothermal: I feel the earth move

Joining the energy underground: residential geothermal power systems

Using carbon dioxide to extract geothermal energy

5. Biofuels: What’s it all about, algae?

Algae to solve the Pentagon’s jet fuel problem

Exxon bets $600 million on algae biofuel despite doubters

6. Fusion: You are my sunshine

Laser fusion test results raise energy hopes

This machine might* save the world

7. Oil: Not all the news is good

Lasting menace: gulf oil-spill disaster likely to exert environmental harm for decades

Think gas is too pricey? Think again.

Finally, we’d like to thank the folks at NewsTrust for helping pull this together, particularly their terrific team: Fabrice Florin, Kaizar Campwala, Jon Mitchell, Beth Wellington, and Mike La Bonte. We invite you to visit http://newstrust.longnow.org, where you can join NewsTrust to comment on stories yourself.

  • vanderleun

    Zowie, what a sheaf of glad tidings of great joy to all peoples!

    But I do think you should also thank Big Oil for making everything you have and everything you see around you and everything you have had all your whole life long possible up to now and for the reasonably foreseeable future.

  • vanderleun

    Humm…. I took your advice and signed up on Newstrust. That’s quite an interesting list of “trusted sources” especially when it comes to blogs and TV. An object lesson in confirmation bias if there ever was one.

  • http://www.restingintheslowlane.blogspot.com bulbul

    That is quite first world centric- how will asia manage its energy- In India i just see limp efforts when there is so much sun and wind and water!

  • gary demos

    I believe that thanking big oil is a little off the mark. It seems that many
    technologies have become obsolete for one reason or another. There is more than one reason that oil is becoming inappropriate for propelling vehicles. To become sentimentally attached to oil seems odd. It’s an inanimate object. As far as big oil goes ……. there are both good things that have come about and negative things that the oil companies have done. As Buckminster Fuller said …. making money and making sense are mutually exclusive. For the most part …. big oil making money seems to be their number one priority …. often at the cost of making sense.

  • Arthurrobey

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