Blog Archive for the ‘Long Shorts’ Category

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Epic Tea Time

Posted on Wednesday, September 5th, 02012 by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander
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Alan Rickman in Portraits in Dramatic Time by David Michalek. Thanks to Laura for sending this in.  Most of our Long Shorts have been time lapses that speed time up, this is a good one on slowing it down…

The project featured an array of glacially paced performances of theater artists and actors all genres and nationalities. With artists featured both singly and in groups, the piece offered a unique and secret glimpse into some of the world’s greatest performing artists.  More at http://www.davidmichalek.net/

Scored by:
Music from Inception – Mind Heist

Created by:
David Michalek

 

Duelity

Posted on Wednesday, August 22nd, 02012 by Alex Mensing
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Duelity from Ryan Uhrich on Vimeo.

Duelity is a split-screen animation that tells both sides of the story of Earth’ s origins in a dizzying and provocative journey through the history and language that marks human thought.

Marcos Ceravolo and Ryan Uhrich designed and directed the short animation Duelity with the Vancouver Film School. We featured it as a Long Short – our series of short films that convey long-term thinking – at the August 02012 SALT talk with Elaine Pagels. Duelity visualizes two versions of the earth’s creation, and Pagels’ presentation delves into the Book of Revelation’s apocalyptic foretelling of its end.

From Above

Posted on Thursday, March 8th, 02012 by Austin Brown
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While searching for a Long Short that could help us visualize the Anthropocene for Mark Lynas’ SALT, we came upon an amazing resource: The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Contained therein are well over a million images of our planet taken from space.

And since NASA is a public institution paid for by American tax dollars, their policy for using the photos is basically, “They’re yours – have at ‘em!” (Just give them some credit – they did go to space to take them for us…)

One particularly exciting section within this massive collection is a series of photos taken by astronauts on the International Space Station using low-light cameras. Stitched together into videos, these images create amazing time-lapse depictions of the Earth and human civilization rotating and pulsing in a starry sky. Despite being over 200 miles below, humanity features significantly in the videos, weaving across the landscape, clustering around water sources and glowing through cloud cover.

Long Now videographer Chris Baldwin created a compilation of some of those videos and set it to Brian Eno’s aptly titled ‘Late Anthropocene’ from Small Craft on a Milk Sea.

A Short History of the Modern Calendar

Posted on Friday, February 3rd, 02012 by Austin Brown
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Keeping time, it turns out, is a messy business. In order to satisfy science, religion, and sometimes ego, our calendar has changed quite a bit throughout history. This video by Jeremiah Warren tells the story up to now.

Since we can’t predict what changes might be made in the future, the 10,000 Year Clock has been designed to keep track of the cycles of the Sun, the Moon, the planets and the constellations – things even the largest of egos will have trouble changing.

100 Years in 10 Minutes

Posted on Saturday, December 31st, 02011 by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander
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Happy new year to all…

derDon1234 created a compilation featuring some of the important events of the last 100 years (2911-1011) in 10 minutes.

via Laughing SquidThe Awesomer, BuzzFeed & MPViral.com

New York Times Lapse

Posted on Friday, August 5th, 02011 by Austin Brown
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Phillip Mendonça-Vieira captured the front page of the website of the New York Times every few hours from September 2010 to July 2011 and made a video of all those images. As far as historical documents go, it’s a hypnotic view into a particular period of time.

On what we might learn from this he says:

Having worked with and developed on a number of content management systems I can tell you that as a rule of thumb no one is storing their frontpage layout data. It’s all gone, and once newspapers shutter their physical distribution operations I get this feeling that we’re no longer going to have a comprehensive archive of how our news-sources of note looked on a daily basis. Archive.orgcomes close, but there are too many gaps to my liking.

This, in my humble opinion, is a tragedy because in many ways our frontpages are summaries of our perspectives and our preconceptions. They store what we thought was important, in a way that is easy and quick to parse and extremely valuable for any future generations wishing to study our time period.

He also did one for the BBC!

La Chaussettologie

Posted on Friday, July 1st, 02011 by Austin Brown
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La Chaussettologie is a short film created by Yann Benedi & Celine Desrumaux for an event called Challenge Your World. La Chaussettologie translates roughly, I’m told, to Sock-ology.

It was the Long Short for Peter Kareiva’s SALT called Conservation in the Real World.

Manhattan in motion

Posted on Friday, June 3rd, 02011 by Austin Brown
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Here’s a beautiful time-lapse of a pulsing, breathing, flowing superorganism:

Mindrelic – Manhattan in motion from Mindrelic on Vimeo.

(via stellar)

The Hourglass

Posted on Tuesday, May 3rd, 02011 by Alex Mensing
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This video documents Australian designer Marc Newson’s (Ikepod) modern take on the hourglass in the Glaskeller factory at Basel, Switzerland. It was directed by Philip Andelman and was featured as part of our “Long Shorts” series of short films that convey long term thinking. This Long Short was screened at Tim Flannery’s “Here On Earth” SALT.

The Hourglass from Ikepod on Vimeo.

San Francisco to Paris in Two Minutes

Posted on Wednesday, April 13th, 02011 by Alex Mensing
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This timelapse of a flight between San Francisco and Paris was created by Beep Show, and is composed of photographs taken roughly every two miles of the entire journey. It was featured as part of our “Long Short” series of short films that convey long term thinking. This Long Short was screened at Ian Morris’ “Why the West Rules – For Now” SALT.

SF to Paris in Two Minutes from Beep Show on Vimeo.