Blog Archive for the ‘Long Shorts’ Category

navigateleft Older Articles    Newer Articles navigateright

Words

Posted on Tuesday, October 26th, 02010 by Alex Mensing
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

This video, which uses words and meaning to stitch together a series of otherwise unrelated shots, was created by Everynone in collaboration with WNYC’s Radiolab and National Public Radio. It was shown as part of our “Long Short” series of short films that convey long term thinking. This Long Short was screened at Lera Boroditsky’s “How Language Shapes Thought” SALT.

WORDS from Everynone on Vimeo.

1945-1998

Posted on Tuesday, September 21st, 02010 by Alex Mensing
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

This video, created by Isao Hashimoto in 2003, fast forwards through the years 1945 to 1998 at the rate of one month per second, depicting each of the 2053 nuclear weapons tests that occurred during that time. It was shown as part of our “Long Shorts” series of short films that convey long term thinking. This Long Short was screened at Richard Rhodes’ “Twilight of the Bombs” SALT.

The Secret Powers of Time

Posted on Tuesday, August 3rd, 02010 by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

Philip Zimbardo’s talk on the Secret Powers of Time wonderfully illustrated in pseudo-realtime by RSA animate. (found via caterina.net)

PIXELS

Posted on Tuesday, July 27th, 02010 by Alex Mensing
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

PIXELS was written and directed by Patrick Jean and produced by One More Production, It was featured as part of our “Long Short” series of short films that convey long term thinking. This Long Short was screened at Jesse Schell’s “Visions of the Gamepocalypse” SALT.

PIXELS by Patrick Jean from ONE MORE PRODUCTION on Vimeo.

Blu’s Stop-Motion History of Life

Posted on Monday, July 19th, 02010 by Austin Brown
link   Categories: Long Shorts, Long Term Art   chat 0 Comments

“Long Shorts” – short films that exemplify long-term thinking.  Please submit yours in the comments section…

Not only does this amazing stop-motion film document a huge swath of history (all of it, really) – it looks like it took a huge swath of history to make.  Thousands of photographs of graffiti evolving and interacting with its environment depict the development of life in the universe to create “Big Bang Big Boom: an unscientific point of view on the beginning and evolution of life… and how it could probably end.”

BIG BANG BIG BOOM – the new wall-painted animation by BLU from blu on Vimeo.

If this theme piques your interest, by the way, you might want to check out one of our upcoming Seminars About Long-term Thinking featuring Martin Rees: “Life’s Future in the Cosmos.”

The woman that programmed the first computer

Posted on Thursday, June 17th, 02010 by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander
link   Categories: Clock of the Long Now, Long Shorts, Long Term Science   chat 0 Comments

“Long Shorts” – short films that exemplify long-term thinking.  Please submit yours in the comments section…

Information Pioneers: Ada Lovelace from Information Pioneers on Vimeo.

This is a nice intro to Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer who wrote programs for Babbage’s mechanical computer. While this computer is similar to the binary mechanical computer used in the first 10,000 Year Clock prototype, Babbage’s computers are decimal based.

Mammoth Time Lapse

Posted on Wednesday, June 9th, 02010 by Bryan Campen - Twitter: @cyrusbryan
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

“Long Shorts” – short films that exemplify long-term thinking.  Please submit yours in the comments section…

This video is part of the Mammoths and Mastodons exhibit at The Field Museum in Chicago, and was the Long Short for our Seminar with Nils Gilman.

It’s a reverse time lapse put together by Greg Mercer and Emily Ward (editing), and David Quednau (animation). Unwinding 20,000 years of a modern American city and frontier outposts, Native American settlements and the last ice age, we arrive in their world and resurrect them in film.

Perhaps most interesting is that this film is not the only place mammoths can now come alive, but also as Stewart points out, it is now possible to take the DNA of mammoths, blend them with elephants and usher in their return.

And I just noticed there was a segment on just this at 60 Minutes this last weekend, Resurrecting The Extinct.

Final note: If you are in Chicago between now and September 6, 02010, take time to also visit the new 3D film of their T. Rex, lovingly named Sue.  Apparently she escaped a little while ago and the museum documented the ordeal.

The Evolution of Life in 60 Seconds

Posted on Thursday, April 1st, 02010 by Alex Mensing
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

This video was created by Claire L. Evans and was commissioned by SEED Magazine for Darwin Day in 2009. By condensing 4.6 billion years of history into a single minute, the artist puts our everyday sense of time in perspective. This video was shown as part of our “Long Shorts” series of short films that convey long term thinking. This Long Short was screened at David Eagleman’s “Six Easy Steps to Avert the Collapse of Civilization” SALT.

The Evolution Of Life in 60 Seconds from universe on Vimeo.

A History of the Sky

Posted on Wednesday, March 10th, 02010 by Austin Brown
link   Categories: Long Shorts, Long Term Art, The Big Here   chat 0 Comments

“Long Shorts” – short films that exemplify long-term thinking.  Please submit yours in the comments section…

Art project in progress A History of the Sky features lots and lots of time-lapse videos of the sky that are synchronized so that they’re all showing the same time of day.  Ken Murphy is the artist that created it and he hopes to one day manifest all the data he’s collecting as a video installation that’s always displaying the skies of the last 365 days.  The project was recently featured at the Exploratorium, but it’s still in a need of a home for the installation.

Here’s how it works.

If you’d like to see an installation in person, here are several upcoming opportunities:

  • Maker Faire UK, at the Life Science Centre Planetarium, Newcastle UK: March 13-14, 2010
  • Google I/O Conference After Hours Party, at Moscone West, San Francisco: May 19, 2010
  • Bay Area Maker Faire, at the San Mateo County Event Center: May 22-23, 2010

The Lava Project

Posted on Saturday, October 31st, 02009 by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander
link   Categories: Long Shorts   chat 0 Comments

“Long Shorts” – short films that exemplify long-term thinking.  Please submit yours in the comments section…

Audience members at Arthur Ganson’s Seminar on September 14, 02009 were among the first viewers of The Lava Project Documentary, which premiered in our new Long Shorts series – short videos that explore, explain, or exemplify long-term thinking and responsibility.

The Lava Project Documentary was created by White Elephant DesignLab, a group of designers who explore natural phenomena and experiment with various materials and their external influences. Earlier this year, the group created a piece at the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii that was inspired by our promotion of long-term thinking through use of the five-digit date. Using a “02009″ stamp made of hardwood and aluminum, they imprinted the congealing surface crust of Pāhoehoe lava in order to equip the emerging lithosphere with its date of origin.

“We developed the idea of using this symbol only when we had already arrived on the island,” says Tobias Kestel of the design team. “We thought it was just the right symbol to use in this context of volcanic activity. Processes of new land being formed by lava flows have been going on for billions of years on the planet, which provided the perfect ground for embossing your symbol of long-term thinking.

“We are aware,” Kestel adds, “that some people might still argue that we actually did alter the environment there. At the same time, the symbolic value and the message and discussions our action will provoke can be and will be of relevance, even if only a few people will start to think differently after having seen the results and having learned about your project, as we will always promote our project together with the reference to The Long Now Foundation.”

For additional photos and information about The Lava Project Documentary, visit the White Elephant DesignLab website.