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Blog Archive for the ‘Long Term Art’ Category

Lightning, Stars and Space: Art That Leaves the Gallery Behind

by Ahmed Kabil on July 30th, 02018

Star Axis by Charles Ross. In Part I of our exploration of Land Art in the American West, we covered the birth of the Land Art movement in the 01960s and some of the seminal works created by Robert Smithson, Michael Heizer, Nancy Holt and James Turrell, which expanded the definition of art and opened up new…  Read More

The Role of Art in Addressing Climate Change: An interview with José Luis de Vicente

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02018

“Sounds super depressing,” she texted. “That’s why I haven’t gone. Sort of went full ostrich.” That was my friend’s response when I asked her if she had attended Després de la fi del món (After the End of the World), the exhibition on the present and future of climate change at the Center of Contemporary Culture in Barcelona…  Read More

This is How You Perform a Piece of Music 1,000 Years Long

by Ahmed Kabil on April 25th, 02018

  Jem Finer’s initial calculations for his Longplayer project, (01995). Time is evoked in music in countless ways. In the first article in this series, we explored some of the long-term themes in Brian Eno’s work and traced that influence to his involvement with the 10,000-Year Clock. Through generative music — a compositional technique that uses a small set of…  Read More

James Turrell, Earthworks, and Monuments of Deep Time

by Ahmed Kabil on March 26th, 02018

James Turrell’s “Roden Crater.” Source: James Turrell As installation begins at the Texas site for Long Now’s monumental 10,000 Year Clock, it’s worth taking a step back to examine the Clock’s larger artistic context and its place in the history of Land Art in the American West. Long Now’s staff and many of the individuals working on the project and serving on…  Read More

Paleolithic Cave Paintings Appear to be the Earliest Examples of Sequential Animation and Graphic Narrative

by Ahmed Kabil on March 24th, 02018

In the 02010s, the animated GIF, for better or worse, took hold as the visual language of internet culture. The ubiquity and increased power of mobile devices enabled users to share animations with ease. And share they did. In 02016, the GIF-sharing site Giphy revealed that its 100 million daily active users sent 1 billion GIFs…  Read More

Music, Time and Long-Term Thinking: Brian Eno Expands the Vocabulary of Human Feeling

by Ahmed Kabil on November 30th, 02017

Brian Eno’s creative activities defy categorization. Widely known as a musician and producer, Eno has expanded the frontiers of audio and visual art for decades, and posited new ways of approaching creativity in general. He is a thinker and speaker, activist and eccentric. He formulated the idea of the Big Here and Long Now—a central conceptual underpinning…  Read More

Why Do Some Forms of Knowledge Go Extinct?

by Ahmed Kabil on July 26th, 02017

The History of Art and Architecture slide library at Trinity College, Dublin. Via the Department of Ultimology. Fiona Hallinan is an artist and researcher based at Trinity College, Dublin. She’s co-founder of a project along with curator Kate Strain called the Department of Ultimology. Ultimology is the study of that which is dead or dying…  Read More

10 Years Ago: Brian Eno’s 77 Million Paintings in San Francisco, 02007

by Mikl Em on June 29th, 02017

Long Now co-founders Stewart Brand (center)and Brian Eno (right) in San Francisco, 02007 Exactly a decade ago today, in June 02007, Long Now hosted the North American Premiere of Brian Eno’s 77 Million Paintings. It was a celebration of Eno’s unique generative art work, as well as the inaugural event of our newly launched Long…  Read More

The Industrial Sublime: Edward Burtynsky Takes the Long View

by Ahmed Kabil on June 19th, 02017

The New Yorker recently profiled photographer, former SALT speaker, and 02016 sponsor of the Conversations at the Interval livestream Edward Burtynsky and his quest to document a changing planet in the anthropocene age. “What I am interested in is how to describe large-scale human systems that impress themselves upon the land,” Burtynsky told New Yorker staff writer…  Read More

Is Anything Original? The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Remediation

by Ahmed Kabil on May 19th, 02017

As PBS Newshour reports, modern-day renaissance workshop Factum Arte preserves art and historical works threatened by war, looting and the passage of time by creating high tech, full-scale reproductions of them. In so doing, the organization is challenging notions of what constitutes an original work of art.  

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