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Blog Archive for the ‘Long Term Science’ Category

Salt Crystals and Selfies: Curiosity after the Seven Minutes of Terror

by Ahmed Kabil on December 22nd, 02014

In October 02013, NASA engineer Adam Steltzner spoke to the Long Now about landing the Curiosity rover on Mars. A decade of exhausted alternatives led Seltzner’s team to take the unconventional approach of a mini-rocket “sky crane” controlled by artificial intelligence to guide the rover to the Martian surface. Because the crane could not be…  Read More

Long Now’s Nevada and Artists with Lasers: January 02015 at The Interval

by Mikl Em on December 18th, 02014

We have just announced our lineup of upcoming events at The Interval for 02015. The first four months of the year will feature talks on art, science, history, technology and long-term thinking. Tickets are on sale now for the first two: January 6, 02015 Scotty Strachan: The Great Basin in the Anthropocene environmental researcher at University…  Read More

Kevin Kelly: Long-term Trends in the Scientific Method — Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on November 20th, 02014

In March 02006 author and Long Now board member Kevin Kelly shared his thoughts on what awaits us in the next century of science. At the time Kevin was already at work on the book What Technology Wants which would be published 5 years later. If you enjoyed Kevin’s 02014 Seminar for Long Now “Technium Unbound“,…  Read More

Mark Lynas: 9 Planetary Boundaries, Finessing the Anthropocene — Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on October 17th, 02014

“The Holocene is over and welcome to the Anthropocene our very uniquely human geological era.” In March 02012 environmental activist and author Mark Lynas gave a sobering assessment of Earth in the Anthropocene. Lynas offers a framework for tracking the health of our planet, outlining nine measurable “boundaries” that if crossed threaten the well-being of humans on Earth. And…  Read More

What Nuclear Waste Management Can Teach Us About Deep Time

by Charlotte Hajer on October 4th, 02014

Many suggest we have entered the Anthropocene – a new geologic epoch ushered in by humanity’s own transformations of Earth’s climate, erosion patterns, extinctions, atmosphere and rock record. In such circumstances, we are challenged to adopt new ways of living, thinking and understanding our relationships with our planetary environment. To do so, anthropologist Richard Irvine…  Read More

Peter Schwartz: The Starships ARE Coming — A Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on September 12th, 02014

In September 02013 futurist Peter Schwartz spoke for Long Now about realistic scenarios for human interstellar travel. Peter, a founding Long Now Board member, participated in “The 100-year Starship” project and contributed to the book Starship Century (Edited by Gregory Benford and James Benford) with scientists and science fiction authors positing realistic ways humanity could voyage beyond our Solar System. Our September Seminar…  Read More

Drew Endy Seminar Primer

by Charlotte Hajer on September 3rd, 02014

On Tuesday, September 16th, Drew Endy presents “The iGEM Revolution“ as part of our monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking. Each month, our Seminar Primer gives you some background about the speaker, including links to explore even more. From Adventures in Synthetic Biology, by Drew Endy Biotechnology is a young science, but it’s already proven its…  Read More

Time Bottled in a Dozen 50-Milliliter Flasks

by Catherine Borgeson on August 21st, 02014

For most living organisms, 60,000 generations is an extensive amount of time. Go back that many human generations, or about 1,500,000 years, and there are fossils suggesting Homo erectus were widespread in East and Southeast Asia at that time. Even for the fruit flies, which geneticists have studied for over a century because of their…  Read More

Stefan Kroepelin Seminar Media

by Andrew Warner on June 25th, 02014

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking. Civilization’s Mysterious Desert Cradle: Rediscovering the Deep Sahara Tuesday June 10, 02014 – San Francisco Video is up on the Kroepelin Seminar page. ********************* Audio is up on the Kroepelin Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast….  Read More

Multi-Millennial Portraits: The Deep Time Photography and Writing of Rachel Sussman

by Catherine Borgeson on June 4th, 02014

The oldest living things in the world are a record and celebration of the past, a call to action in the present, and a barometer of our future, writes artist and SALT speaker Rachel Sussman in The Oldest Living Things in the World. When Rachel spoke for Long Now in 02010 her book on organisms that have lived…  Read More