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Blog Archive for the ‘Long Term Science’ Category

Proof: The Science of Booze by Adam Rogers

by Mikl Em on May 29th, 02014

Photo by Adam Rogers The earliest evidence of a deliberately made alcoholic drink comes from a 10,000 year old piece of Chinese pottery. Lab tests revealed traces of a fermented mixture of rice honey and fruit. It would have been hard to mix those ingredients and keep it from fermenting. Adam Rogers has held that…  Read More

Sylvia Earle & Tierney Thys Seminar Primer

by Charlotte Hajer on May 6th, 02014

National Geographic Explorers-in-Residence Sylvia Earle & Tierney Thys are among the world’s leading champions of ocean conservation. Through research, writing, and public outreach, they raise awareness of the ocean’s myriad beauties – and its vital importance to all life on the planet. Sylvia Earle is a pioneer in the field of ocean conservation and marine…  Read More

Mariana Mazzucato Seminar Primer

by Andrew Warner on March 10th, 02014

Since the Enlightenment and its corresponding assumptions of social-technological progress, scholars have debated what political and economic systems best facilitate technological growth. These days, one of the common assumptions of the technology sector is that the government is fundamentally a limiting force when it comes to innovation. This view is a well-established conservative position since…  Read More

ICE/ISEE-3 To Return To An Earth No Longer Capable of Speaking To It

by Charlotte Hajer on February 24th, 02014

This August, a pioneer in space exploration returns to Earth after more than 30 years of service. The spacecraft is still in good, functioning condition, and could possibly be assigned to another mission. Sadly, however, we seem to have forgotten how to speak its language. The probe, a collaboration between NASA and ESA, was one…  Read More

The New California Water Atlas

by Austin Brown on February 1st, 02014

Almost forty years ago, California’s young new governor faced the challenge of leading his state through one of its worst droughts ever. Around that time, a group of cartographers had been hoping to develop a comprehensive and definitive atlas of the state and one of them suggested the idea to an advisor to the governor’s…  Read More

“Climate Change and Us” Event Video Now Live

by Andrew Warner on December 23rd, 02013

Rarely do we get to hear directly from the scientists who compile, analyze, and synthesize the most recent climate change data. On December 13th, swissnex San Francisco, in partnership with The Long Now Foundation, hosted an event that explained the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s most recent report, and what types of solutions would be…  Read More

Wake up, Rosetta!

by Austin Brown on December 16th, 02013

Almost ten years ago, the European Space Agency launched a probe with the goal of approaching and studying a comet. The probe was named Rosetta because, just as the Rosetta Stone allowed historians to piece together an ancient language and unlock a great deal of human history, the Rosetta probe will give us a better…  Read More

A 75-year Study on the Secrets to Happiness

by Charlotte Hajer on November 27th, 02013

The credit for growing old with grace and vitality, it seems, goes more to ourselves than to our stellar genetic make-up. So concludes the synopsis of Triumphs of Experience, the latest book to come out of the Harvard Grant Study, an ambitious and comprehensive project that has tracked the life course of 268 male members…  Read More

Climate Change and Us: What Does the Future Hold?

by Austin Brown on November 14th, 02013

Peer beyond the headlines as experts explain what the IPCC report really says about global warming and what it means for our planet and for mankind in a live presentation and discussion on Friday December 13, 02013 at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will release…  Read More

Humans and nature: It’s complicated.

by Austin Brown on October 25th, 02013

Depending on your point of reference, humanity can seem distinct from and damaging to nature or like an emergent part of a single thriving force. Two interviews with the authors of new books illustrate this elasticity and the multifaceted conceptions of ourselves and nature we shift through depending on the questions we ask and the…  Read More

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