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Blog Archive for the ‘Long Term Thinking’ Category

Most all words replaced in 2000 years

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 25th, 02007

This is a great appendix I just came across on the half life of vocabulary in a language. From the text: The rate of vocabulary change The half-life of a word is the amount of time required for there to be a 50% chance that it will be replaced by a new word. Most words…  Read More

World Without Us in 15,000 Years

by Kevin Kelly on August 22nd, 02007

The best-selling book The World Without Us draws scenarios of what our home planet would look like if our civilization suddenly vanished. The book’s website has a small slide show with a graphic illustrations of some scenes from the future in this scenario. Click down to Visual TImeline Slideshow. It’s a coherent long view.

How many cloudy years per millennia?

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 20th, 02007

(Matthew Salzer pulls a core sample from a tree on the Long Now Nevada property) One of the ways that the 10,000 year Clock of the Long Now will stay accurate over the millennia is with a solar synchronizer. The interesting question that comes up with doing this, is that we need to understand how…  Read More

Environmental History Timeline

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 10th, 02007

  This dynamic timeline of environmental history sent to me by Stewart Brand is a nice overview starting over 2000 years ago.  I especially like that it points out that we humans are not new to altering our natural environment in detrimental ways.  However it does seem to omit the Native American story of hunting…  Read More

Long Term Thinking Uses Separate Neural System

by Kevin Kelly on August 10th, 02007

From Science Blogs comes this news about how long term thinking uses separate neural pathways in our brains than short term thinking. So why do people take out sub-prime loans? Don’t they realize that they won’t be able to afford the ensuing 28 years of mortgage payments? I think a big part of the reason…  Read More

Genetic diversity on the decline…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 8th, 02007

By studying mitochondrial DNA from samples over 1000 years old to the present, scientists have good evidence that human genetic diverstiy is on the decline. You can see the article from the Royal Society here (a great source of many forms of long term science in general). “In a study covering five different periods of…  Read More

Long-term agricultural experiments

by Stephanie Gerson on August 1st, 02007

Add England’s Rothamsted Experimental Station to the list of long-term experiments. “Rothamsted’s Classical experiments are unique in their age and variety, and are, deservedly, world-famous. There are many other experiments on our Rothamsted and Woburn farms that, by conventional standards, can justifiably be described as ‘long-term’. Most of these were originally established to study long-term…  Read More

Living furniture

by Stephanie Gerson on July 28th, 02007

Arborsculpture, a term coined by Richard Reames, “is the art of shaping trees trunks. It is often accomplished by framing, bending, grafting and pruning. [sic] Using one or many trees guided into pre designed shapes, functional or artistic, to remain living or to be harvested” (Reames). Arborsculptors engage in a very slow ‘sculpting’ of trees…  Read More

Politics or foresight

by Stuart Candy on July 25th, 02007

…take your pick. (Thanks to Jamais Cascio for spotting this.) From an interview with US Secretary of State, Condoleeza Rice, by BusinessWeek magazine: BusinessWeek: Would you consider a position in business or on Wall Street? Condoleezza Rice: I don’t know what I’ll do long-term. I’m a terrible long-term planner. ~ “A Resolute Condoleezza Rice“, BusinessWeek,…  Read More

Where was the moon 3.2 billion years ago?

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on July 17th, 02007

My friend Camron sent me this great geeky blog piece on a bedding plain that was laid down by tides created by our moon 3.2 billion years ago. It not only shows the moon affects, but it also shows us it was in a lower orbit then…