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Blog Archive for the ‘Long News’ Category

Apollo 17 Digital Archive

by Andrew Warner on January 5th, 02016

Relive the sights and sounds of Apollo 17 – the final mission of NASA’s Apollo program, on its 43rd anniversary.  Ben Feist, a developer from Toronto, has built an interface to experience the Apollo 17 mission that syncs the 300 hours of mission audio, 22 hours of video, and 4,200 pictures, along with commentary from the astronauts, into…  Read More

Salt Crystals and Selfies: Curiosity after the Seven Minutes of Terror

by Ahmed Kabil on December 22nd, 02014

In October 02013, NASA engineer Adam Steltzner spoke to the Long Now about landing the Curiosity rover on Mars. A decade of exhausted alternatives led Seltzner’s team to take the unconventional approach of a mini-rocket “sky crane” controlled by artificial intelligence to guide the rover to the Martian surface. Because the crane could not be…  Read More

Time Bottled in a Dozen 50-Milliliter Flasks

by Catherine Borgeson on August 21st, 02014

For most living organisms, 60,000 generations is an extensive amount of time. Go back that many human generations, or about 1,500,000 years, and there are fossils suggesting Homo erectus were widespread in East and Southeast Asia at that time. Even for the fruit flies, which geneticists have studied for over a century because of their…  Read More

Mapping the Long Walk – An Out of Eden Update

by Chia Evers on June 20th, 02014

In January 02013, we introduced you to slow journalist Paul Salopek, who is retracing the steps of our earliest human ancestors in a seven-year journey Out of Eden. Since then, Salopek has covered more than 4,000 kilometers (nearly 2,500 miles), from in Eastern Ethiopia to East Jerusalem. His route was, intentionally, sketched in broad strokes,…  Read More

Lost century-old Antarctic images found and conserved

by Catherine Borgeson on January 10th, 02014

Photo: Antarctic Heritage Trust (NZ) A small box of 22 exposed but unprocessed photographic negatives left nearly a century  ago in an Antarctic exploration hut has been discovered and conserved by New Zealand’s Antarctic Heritage Trust. “It’s the first example that I’m aware of, of undeveloped negatives from a century ago from the Antarctic heroic…  Read More

Retro Report Revisits News of the Not-Too-Distant-Past

by Austin Brown on September 16th, 02013

At what point does news become history? With the pace of modern journalism, one could argue it happens pretty quickly, but reality doesn’t always move as fast as the media. Many of the stories we actually need to hear simply don’t fit inside a hype cycle and thus aren’t fully told. One organization grappling with…  Read More

Almost everything is getting better

by Kirk Citron on August 10th, 02011

The Long News: stories that might still matter fifty, or a hundred, or ten thousand years from now. Last week The Millennium Project released its 02011 State Of The Future report, looking at trends for the past twenty years and projecting ahead for the next decade. (Not the 10,000 year future, but still of interest.) You…  Read More

Anthropocene arrives

by Alex Mensing on March 16th, 02011

Since the end of the last ice age a little over 10,000 years or so ago, human civilization has blossomed in a climatically friendly epoch known as the Holocene. The flowers are still blooming, but as climate change begins to mix things up some have been predicting that the story of recent and pending human…  Read More

The global brain

by Kirk Citron on February 21st, 02011

The Long News: stories that might still matter fifty, or a hundred, or ten thousand years from now. A computer defeats humans on a television game show. An information network brings down a series of dictatorships. We are witnessing a massive explosion in data, and an equally massive explosion in our ability to process and…  Read More

How Much Does a Kilogram Weigh?

by Alex Mensing on February 16th, 02011

As a recent New York Times article observes, the kilogram is officially defined as “a unit of mass equal to the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram.” Well, it turns out that the prototype, a chunk of platinum and iridium housed at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in France, has lost…  Read More