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Blog Archive for the ‘The Big Here’ Category

Mapping the Long Walk – An Out of Eden Update

by Chia Evers on June 20th, 02014

In January 02013, we introduced you to slow journalist Paul Salopek, who is retracing the steps of our earliest human ancestors in a seven-year journey Out of Eden. Since then, Salopek has covered more than 4,000 kilometers (nearly 2,500 miles), from in Eastern Ethiopia to East Jerusalem. His route was, intentionally, sketched in broad strokes,…  Read More

Explore Urban Infrastructure at the MacroCity Conference, May 30-31

by Charlotte Hajer on April 15th, 02014

We rarely see in full the cities that we live in. Focused on our daily lives, urban dwellers are often only dimly aware of the numerous, enmeshed layers of critical infrastructure that quietly hum in the background to make modern life possible. Come and explore the amazing stories and surprising histories to be found lurking…  Read More

Watermark: New Film by Edward Burtynsky

by Charlotte Hajer on April 14th, 02014

Every living thing requires water. We humans interact with it in a myriad of ways, numerous times a day. But how often do we consider the complexity of that interaction? Renowned photographer and former SALT speaker Edward Burtynsky explores these questions in a new film. Co-directed by Burtynsky and filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal, Watermark is a…  Read More

The New California Water Atlas

by Austin Brown on February 1st, 02014

Almost forty years ago, California’s young new governor faced the challenge of leading his state through one of its worst droughts ever. Around that time, a group of cartographers had been hoping to develop a comprehensive and definitive atlas of the state and one of them suggested the idea to an advisor to the governor’s…  Read More

An Animated Atlas of The Known World

by Charlotte Hajer on January 28th, 02014

In 01830, English journalist Edward Quin created a historical atlas that illustrated our expanding knowledge of the world. Depicting a time span that stretched from 02348 BC to 01828 AD, or more than four millennia, each successive map showed a slightly larger piece of bright, colorful land, surrounded by the ominous clouds of the unknown….  Read More

David Rumsey’s Historic Maps of San Francisco on Display at SFO

by Charlotte Hajer on December 20th, 02013

There’s no place like an airport to ponder the notion of place in both its microscopic and macroscopic manifestations – in its continuities, and its evolutions. Next time you fly in or out of San Francisco’s International Airport, take a stroll down to Terminal 2 (post-security), where a series of historic local maps and drawings…  Read More

A visit to Star Axis

by Austin Brown on November 11th, 02013

Having climbed the staircase for some time, I stopped on a step that sent me back to the sky of twenty-five hundred years ago, the sky that loomed overhead when the Book of Job was written. I braced myself against the cool stone of the corridor that bracketed the staircase, and looked up through the…  Read More

Humans and nature: It’s complicated.

by Austin Brown on October 25th, 02013

Depending on your point of reference, humanity can seem distinct from and damaging to nature or like an emergent part of a single thriving force. Two interviews with the authors of new books illustrate this elasticity and the multifaceted conceptions of ourselves and nature we shift through depending on the questions we ask and the…  Read More

Harmonic Spheres and the Music of the Cosmos

by Charlotte Hajer on August 21st, 02013

In the 6th century BC, Pythagoras developed the science of harmonics. Legend has it that he was inspired by the sounds emanating from a blacksmith’s shop; producing experimental music with hammers and anvils, Pythagoras realized that the relationship between different musical notes can be expressed in the form of simple mathematical ratios. Pythagoras saw in…  Read More

Leap Seconds and the Nature of Civil Time

by Charlotte Hajer on July 31st, 02013

The U.S. Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock, located on the 2nd Space Operations Squadron’s operations center, is accurate to within one second every 20 million years. The clock showed 23:59:60 Saturday as 2nd SOPS and USNO professionals added the first leap second in seven years. About two months ago, a group of scholars gathered in…  Read More