Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Is Anything Original? The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Remediation

by Ahmed Kabil on May 19th, 02017

As PBS Newshour reports, modern-day renaissance workshop Factum Arte preserves art and historical works threatened by war, looting and the passage of time by creating high tech, full-scale reproductions of them. In so doing, the organization is challenging notions of what constitutes an original work of art.  

A Monument to Outlast Humanity

by Ahmed Kabil on May 17th, 02017

Michael Heizer, an eccentric pioneer of the Earthworks movement, is almost done with the mile-and-a-half sculpture he’s been working on for upwards of half a century in a remote Nevada desert. And almost nobody has seen it. “City,” inspired by the ancient ritual sites of past civilizations and set to open to the public in 02020, is one of…  Read More

The Orrery at The Interval: An Invitation to Long-Term Thinking

by Ahmed Kabil on April 24th, 02017

As visitors to Fort Mason amble past The Interval, the Long Now Foundation’s cafe-bar-museum-venue space, some are drawn, as if by gravitational pull, to an unusual eight foot-tall stainless steel technological curiosity they glimpse through the glass doors. Metal gears sit stacked one on top of the other to form a tower, with geneva wheels jutting…  Read More

How Hard Would It Be To Restart Civilization From Scratch?

by Ahmed Kabil on April 24th, 02017

It may take a village to raise a child, but it takes an entire civilization to build a toaster. That’s what Designer Thomas Thwaites learned when he set himself the challenge of building his own, from start to Pop Tarts. He smelted ore, coaxed plastic out of oil, and toiled towards a prototype that worked for…  Read More

Tiffany Shlain Presents 50/50 Day

by Ahmed Kabil on April 14th, 02017

“Women have always been an equal part of the past,” the American feminist Gloria Steinem once said. “We just haven’t been a part of history.” On May 10th, thousands of people will gather at events across the globe to discuss what it will take to get to a more gender-balanced world. It’s part of the 50/50…  Read More

These 1,000-Year-Old Windmills Work Perfectly, But Their Future is in Doubt

by Ahmed Kabil on April 10th, 02017

From National Geographic comes a video profiling the durable windmills of Nashtifan, Iran. These windmills constructed over a thousand years ago out of clay, straw and wood are not only still standing; they work just as well as they did when they were first built. In designing and building the Clock of the Long Now, we…  Read More

Could Reviving the Woolly Mammoth Help Solve Climate Change?

by Ahmed Kabil on March 28th, 02017

For over 100,000 years, wide swaths of the northern part of the globe were covered in grasslands where millions of bison, horses, and woolly mammoths grazed. Known as the Mammoth Steppe, it was the world’s most extensive biome, stretching from Spain to Canada, with more animal biomass than the African Savannah. With the arrival of…  Read More

Frank Ostaseski Seminar Tickets

by Andrew Warner on March 17th, 02017

  The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking Frank Ostaseski on “What the Dying Teach the Living” TICKETS Monday April 10, 02017 at 7:30pm SFJAZZ Center Long Now Members can reserve 2 seats, join today! General Tickets $15   About this Seminar: Frank Ostaseski is a Buddhist teacher, lecturer and author, whose focus…  Read More

The Other 10,000 Year Project: Long-Term Thinking and Nuclear Waste

by Ahmed Kabil on March 16th, 02017

With half-lives ranging from 30 to 24,000, or even 16 million years , the radioactive elements in nuclear waste defy our typical operating time frames. The questions around nuclear waste storage — how to keep it safe from those who might wish to weaponize it, where to store it, by what methods, for how long,…  Read More

A Brief Economic History of Time

by Ahmed Kabil on March 16th, 02017

“The age of exploration and the industrial revolution completely changed the way people measure time, understand time, and feel and talk about time,” writes Derek Thompson of The Atlantic. “This made people more productive, but did it make them any happier?” In a wide-ranging essay touching upon the advent of the wristwatch, railroads, and Daylight…  Read More