Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Galloping, GIFs and Genes: Geneticists Store Moving Image in Living Bacteria

by Ahmed Kabil on August 22nd, 02017

In 01872, California Governor Leland Stanford hired the famed photographer Eadweard Muybridge to settle a question of popular debate—whether all four of a horse’s feet ever left the ground when it galloped. The resulting series of photographs, Sallie Gardner at a Gallop, showed without a doubt that horses do indeed go airborne at a full…  Read More

Why Do Some Forms of Knowledge Go Extinct?

by Ahmed Kabil on July 26th, 02017

The History of Art and Architecture slide library at Trinity College, Dublin. Via the Department of Ultimology. Fiona Hallinan is an artist and researcher based at Trinity College, Dublin. She’s co-founder of a project along with curator Kate Strain called the Department of Ultimology. Ultimology is the study of that which is dead or dying…  Read More

Interview: Alexander Rose and Phil Libin on Long-Term Thinking

by Ahmed Kabil on July 19th, 02017

Long Now Executive Director Alexander Rose and former Evernote CEO Phil Libin recently spoke with the design agency Dialogue about the layers of civilization, the future of products, and the Clock of the Long Now. The interview is wide-ranging, covering everything from the early tech, design and science fiction influences in Rose and Libin’s childhoods to…  Read More

The Artangel Longplayer Letters: Alan Moore writes to Stewart Lee

by Ahmed Kabil on July 12th, 02017

Alan Moore (left) chose comedian Stewart Lee as the recipient of his Longplayer letter. In January 02017, Iain Sinclair, a writer and filmmaker whose recent work focuses on the psychogeography of London, wrote a letter to writer Alan Moore as part of the Artangel Longplayer Letters series. The series is a relay-style correspondence, with the recipient of the letter responding with a letter to a different…  Read More

The Hermit Who Inadvertently Shaped Climate-Change Science

by Ahmed Kabil on July 6th, 02017

Billy Barr was just trying to get away from it all when he went to live at the base of Gothic Mountain in the Colorado wilderness in 1973. He wound up creating an invaluable historical record of climate change. His motivation for meticulously logging the changing temperatures, snow levels, weather, and wildlife sightings? Simple boredom. Now, the…  Read More

The AI Cargo Cult: The Myth of a Superhuman Artificial Intelligence

by Ahmed Kabil on July 5th, 02017

In a widely-shared essay first published in Backchannel, Kevin Kelly, a Long Now co-founder and Founding Editor of Wired Magazine, argues that the inevitable rise of superhuman artificial intelligence—long predicted by leaders in science and technology—is a myth based on misperceptions without evidence. Kevin is now Editor at Large at Wired and has spoken in the Seminar…  Read More

10 Years Ago: Brian Eno’s 77 Million Paintings in San Francisco, 02007

by Mikl Em on June 29th, 02017

Long Now co-founders Stewart Brand (center)and Brian Eno (right) in San Francisco, 02007 Exactly a decade ago today, in June 02007, Long Now hosted the North American Premiere of Brian Eno’s 77 Million Paintings. It was a celebration of Eno’s unique generative art work, as well as the inaugural event of our newly launched Long…  Read More

The Artangel Longplayer Letters: Iain Sinclair writes to Alan Moore

by Ahmed Kabil on June 23rd, 02017

Iain Sinclair (left) chose Alan Moore as the recipient of his Longplayer letter. In November 02015, Manuel Arriga  wrote a letter to Giles Fraser as part of the Artangel Longplayer Letters series. The series is a relay-style correspondence: The first letter was written by Brian Eno to Nassim Taleb. Nassim Taleb then wrote to Stewart Brand, and Stewart wrote…  Read More

The Nuclear Bunker Preserving Movie History

by Ahmed Kabil on June 22nd, 02017

During the Cold War, this underground bunker in Culpeper, Virginia was where the government would have taken the president if a nuclear war broke out. Now, the Library of Congress is using it to preserve all manner of films, from Casablanca to Harry Potter. The oldest films were made on nitrate, a fragile and highly…  Read More

The Industrial Sublime: Edward Burtynsky Takes the Long View

by Ahmed Kabil on June 19th, 02017

The New Yorker recently profiled photographer, former SALT speaker, and 02016 sponsor of the Conversations at the Interval livestream Edward Burtynsky and his quest to document a changing planet in the anthropocene age. “What I am interested in is how to describe large-scale human systems that impress themselves upon the land,” Burtynsky told New Yorker staff writer…  Read More