Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Brian Eno’s Soundtrack for the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

by Ahmed Kabil on July 12th, 02019

50 years ago, the Apollo 11 moon landing was televised live to some 600 million viewers back on planet Earth. One of them was future Long Now co-founder Brian Eno, then 21. He found himself underwhelmed by what he saw. 

Footage from the television transmission of the moon landing.

Surely, there was more. . .   Read More

The Global Tree Restoration Potential

by Ahmed Kabil on July 9th, 02019

Earlier this month, a study appeared in Science that found that a global reforestation effort could capture 205 gigatons of CO2 over the next 40-100 years—two thirds of all the CO2 humans have generated since the industrial revolution:

The restoration of trees remains among the most effective strategies for climate change mitigation. We. . .   Read More

Long-Lived Institutions

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on June 27th, 02019

The Sagrada Familia Catholic Church in Barcelona, Spain. The Catholic Church is one of the longest-lived institutions in human history.

The Long Now Foundation was founded in 01996 with the idea to build a 10,000 year clock — an icon to long-term thinking that might inspire people to engage more deeply with. . .   Read More

Revive & Restore Releases Ocean Genomics Horizon Scan

by Ahmed Kabil on June 26th, 02019

Revive & Restore has released a 200-page report providing the first-of-its-kind assessment of genomic and biotech innovations to complement, enhance, and accelerate today’s marine conservation strategies.

Revive & Restore’s mission is to enhance biodiversity through the genetic rescue of endangered and extinct species. In pursuit of this and in. . .   Read More

How We Spend Time

by Ahmed Kabil on June 21st, 02019

Earlier this year, Craig Mod set out on a 620 mile walk across Japan to see if he could develop a more mindful relationship with his smartphone. Along the way, he discovered the benefits of boredom, the “experience of time,” and the enriching details we miss when we remain always-on:

A month ago, when. . .   Read More

Long-term Thinking in a Start-up Town

by Ahmed Kabil on June 18th, 02019

Long Now’s Executive Director Alexander Rose recently appeared on the Freakonomics podcast in Episode 381, “Long-term Thinking in a Start-up Town.” The podcast was recorded before a live audience in a variety show format. In addition to Rose, the show featured the co-founder of Lyft, a pioneer in male birth control. . .   Read More

Legacy of Female Primatologists Jane Goodall & Dian Fossey — Elizabeth Lonsdorf at The Interval

by Ahmed Kabil on June 16th, 02019

Primatologist Elizabeth Lonsdorf shares the story of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, two of the three ‘Trimates’ who revolutionized the field of primatology with their studies of gorillas and chimpanzees.

From the Conversation at The Interval, “Growing Up Ape: The Long-term Science of Studying Our Closest Living Relatives” by. . .   Read More

The Peculiar Blindness of Experts

by Ahmed Kabil on June 14th, 02019

Predictions, regardless of their accuracy, help us think about the future and learn about the now. For its June 02019 issue, The Atlantic features an adapted essay on the practice of predicting the future from David Epstein’s recent book, Range. 

The track record of expert forecasters—in science, in economics, in. . .   Read More

Bruno Latour Mounts a Defense of Science

by Ahmed Kabil on June 8th, 02019

Earlier this year, The New York Times published a profile of philosopher Bruno Latour on the occasion of the publication of his new book, Down to Earth. “He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority,” Ava Kofman writes. “Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?”

What journalists, scientists and other. . .   Read More

Rumsey Digital Map Collection Grows Even Larger

by Ahmed Kabil on June 4th, 02019

Last year, we wrote about one of the jewels of Stanford University’s Rumsey Map Collection, Urbano Monte’s planisphere of 01587. The planisphere was an ambitious map of the world across sixty individual sheets that, were it to be stitched together as Monte’s instructions dictated, would be the largest world map made in. . .   Read More

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