Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Blog Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Jim Henson’s “Time Piece”

by Simone Davalos on November 16th, 02007

This short film is a groovy meditation on time in a few of its facets:

“Dislocation in time, time signatures, time as a philosophical concept, and slavery to time are some of the themes touched upon in this nine-minute, experimental film, which was written, directed, and produced by Jim Henson-and starred Jim Henson. . .   Read More

1,000 Year Clock of planted trees

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on November 7th, 02007

Paolo Savagione (lead engineer on our Clock Project) sent in this nifty video of a 1000 year forestry-clock idea in France. We have talked about ideas like this for the 10,000 Year Clock, but this is the first simulation of such an idea I have seen. I think however that there might be. . .   Read More

The Battle of Anghiari

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on October 23rd, 02007

Peter Paul Rubens’s copy of a copy of Da Vinci’s The Battle of Anghiari
I just received this update on the lost Davinci painting The Battle of Anghiari from Davide Bocelli, a Long Now member and long time friend of the Foundation in Italy… This is a good reminder how difficult it can. . .   Read More

All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 27th, 02007

 At the Singularity Summit earlier this month I came to see Paul Saffo’s talk.  Famed as a forecaster and future thinker, I was expecting to hear what lay ahead in the world as the steepness of the technology curve continues towards cliff like proportions.  Instead all were treated to a reminder that our new. . .   Read More

3000 frames per second is slow…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 13th, 02007

In the 15.08 issue of Wired is an interesting story on photographer David Michalek who seems to have pushed the tech of hi res – hi frame count film equipment to a new level, in ordeer to create is most recent piece of dancers in ultra slow motion. I always find it ironic that the […]

500 Years of Female Portraits in Western Art

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 9th, 02007

This youtube video sent to us by Stuart Silverstone is impressive not just for its stretch of time, but style, medium and interpretation as well. Or as Stewart Brand said, this is an “amazing form of time travel…”

You can also see a complete list of artists and paintings here. . .   Read More

Living furniture

by Stephanie Gerson on July 28th, 02007

Arborsculpture, a term coined by Richard Reames, “is the art of shaping trees trunks. It is often accomplished by framing, bending, grafting and pruning. [sic] Using one or many trees guided into pre designed shapes, functional or artistic, to remain living or to be harvested” (Reames).

Arborsculptors engage in a very slow ‘sculpting’ of trees. . .   Read More

5,000 Years of Oil

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on July 26th, 02007

(AFP/Eric Estrade)   Artist Christo, is building one of his first long term pieces in the desert of the United Arab Emerites comprised of 390,000 oil barrels stacked 492 feet high. The project is a far cry from the ephemeral artworks for which the couple are best known, like wrapping the Berlin Reichstag and the […]

Art in geological time

by Stuart Candy on July 24th, 02007

Domain Field (02003) :: image at antonygormley.com
I recently met British sculptor Antony Gormley at the EGS summer session in Saas-Fee, Switzerland. Most of his works interpret the human body, and many of them replicate actual bodies — frequently his own. A deeply thoughtful presentation of his work during an evening seminar impressed on me. . .   Read More

A Moment On Earth

by Simone Davalos on July 15th, 02007

On August 5th, 2004 at 12:00 noon GMT, and again exactly 12 hours later, 60 filmmakers around the world set out to capture a single Moment on Earth.

A Moment On Earth is a fascinating film project has been years in the making. Working with a huge network of independent crews and directors all. . .   Read More