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Blog Archive for the ‘The Clock of the Long Now’ Category

How to Be in Time

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on August 14th, 02020

Slow clocks are growing in popularity, perhaps as a tonic for or revolt against the historical trend of ever-faster timekeeping mechanisms. . . .   Read More

The Past and Future of the Earth’s Oldest Trees

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on January 14th, 02020

Alex Ross has written a moving tribute to Long Now’s unofficial mascot, the bristlecone pine, in The New Yorker. What is most astonishing about Pinus longaeva is not the age of any single organism but the collective oldness and otherness of its entire community. No two super-elderly trees look alike, to . . .   Read More

How to Send Messages 10,000 Years into the Future

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on October 11th, 02019

Popular Science recently profiled our Rosetta and 10,000 Year Clock projects, as well as a number of related long-term thinking projects, such as Martin Kunze’s Memory of Mankind, the Apollo 12 MoonArk, nuclear waste ray cats, the Star Map at Hoover Dam, and more. Corroded, wrecked, and half-buried for . . .   Read More

New Interview with Long Now Co-Founder Danny Hillis about 10,000 Year Clock

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on May 21st, 02019

Long Now co-founder Danny Hillis was recently interviewed by e-flux for its Digital X collaboration with the Norman Foster Foundation. He spoke about his inspiration and process for building the 10,000 Year Clock, as well as the value of long-term thinking.

The value of the clock is mostly in thinking about. . .   Read More

The Equation of Time Cam: Keeping Good Time for 10,000 Years

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on December 5th, 02018

Fig. 1. The Equation of Time Cam. In the collections of the Royal Observatory of Greenwich, amongst the myriad time-keeping and navigational devices of the past, there sits a curious artifact built to last into a future none of us will witness. Standing half-a-foot tall, it looks more like a sculpture than an instrument of time, […]

Clock of the Long Now – Installation Begins

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 20th, 02018

  “The Long Now is the recognition that the precise moment you’re in grows out of the past and is a seed for the future.”                   – Brian Eno (founding board member of The Long Now Foundation) After over a decade of design and fabrication, we have […]

Danny Hillis publishes new essay on Long-Term Timekeeping in the Clock of the Long Now

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on November 7th, 02017

Danny Hillis, Long Now co-founder and designer of the 10,000 Year Clock, has a new essay, “Long-Term Timekeeping in the Clock of the Long Now” in the book The Science of Time 2016: Time in Astronomy & Society, Past, Present and Future (published November 02017). The Science of Time 2016 presents “information. . .   Read More

Interview: Alexander Rose and Phil Libin on Long-Term Thinking

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on July 19th, 02017

Long Now Executive Director Alexander Rose and former Evernote CEO Phil Libin recently spoke with the design agency Dialogue about the layers of civilization, the future of products, and the Clock of the Long Now. The interview is wide-ranging, covering everything from the early tech, design and science fiction influences in Rose and Libin’s childhoods to […]

The Orrery at The Interval: An Invitation to Long-Term Thinking

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on April 24th, 02017

As visitors to Fort Mason amble past The Interval, the Long Now Foundation’s cafe-bar-museum-venue space, some are drawn, as if by gravitational pull, to an unusual eight foot-tall stainless steel technological curiosity they glimpse through the glass doors. Metal gears sit stacked one on top of the other to form a tower, with geneva wheels jutting […]

These 1,000-Year-Old Windmills Work Perfectly, But Their Future is in Doubt

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on April 10th, 02017

From National Geographic comes a video profiling the durable windmills of Nashtifan, Iran. These windmills constructed over a thousand years ago out of clay, straw and wood are not only still standing; they work just as well as they did when they were first built.

In designing and building the Clock of the Long Now. . .   Read More

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