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Blog Archive for the ‘Computing’ Category

New Book Explores the Legacy of Paul Otlet’s Mundaneum

by Charlotte Hajer on September 23rd, 02014

In 02007, SALT speaker Alex Wright introduced us to Paul Otlet, the Belgian visionary who spent the first half of the twentieth century building a universal catalog of human knowledge, and who dreamed of creating a global information network that would allow anyone virtual access to this “Mundaneum.”
In June of this year, Wright released. . .   Read More

How Hard Should the Turing Test Be?

by Austin Brown on July 29th, 02014

It seems clear that computers are becoming more intelligent, but in the face of this fact, our definition of intelligence itself seems increasingly blurry. The University of Reading recently made an announcement exemplifying this trend:
The 65 year-old iconic Turing Test was passed for the very first time by computer program Eugene Goostman during. . .   Read More

Retrocomputing Brings Warhol’s Lost Digital Art Back to Life

by Catherine Borgeson on May 16th, 02014

In 01985, Andy Warhol used an Amiga 1000 personal computer and the GraphiCraft software to create a series of digital works. Warhol’s early computer artworks are now viewable after 30 years of dormancy.
Commodore International commissioned Warhol to appear at the product launch and produce a few public pieces showing off the Amiga’s. . .   Read More

George Dyson: No Time Is There – A Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on April 4th, 02014

In March 02013 George Dyson spoke for Long Now about the origins of the digital universe. Dyson, an author and science historian, gave a detailed explication of the dawn of the modern computer in the 1950s at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study (IAS). Twice a month we highlight a Seminar About Long-term Thinking. . .   Read More

A 240-Year Old Programmable Computer Boy

by Charlotte Hajer on November 14th, 02013

In the late 18th century, Swiss clock- and watchmaker Pierre Jaquet Droz decided to advertise his business by building three automata, or mechanical robots, in the shape of young children. Still functional after almost 240 years, the machines are a marvel of mechanical engineering. “The Musician” is a girl who plays an organ – her eyes. . .   Read More

Nicholas Negroponte, “A World of Convergence”

by Austin Brown on April 30th, 02013

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Beyond Digital
Wednesday April 17, 02013 – San Francisco
 
Video is up on the Negroponte Seminar page for Members.
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Audio is up on the Negroponte Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
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A world of. . .   Read More

Nicholas Negroponte Seminar Primer

by Andrew Warner on April 4th, 02013

“Beyond Digital”
Wednesday April 17, 02012 at the Marines’ Memorial Theater, San Francisco

Nicholas Negroponte has made a name for himself not just by predicting the future, but by creating it. He co-founded and, for 15 years, directed the MIT Media Lab, which has become the premier academic incubator for advanced technologies research in. . .   Read More

George Dyson, “The Digital Big Bang”

by Andrew Warner on March 28th, 02013

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

“No Time Is There”— The Digital Universe and Why Things Appear To Be Speeding Up
Tuesday March 19, 02013 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Dyson Seminar page for Members.
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Audio is up on the Dyson. . .   Read More

George Dyson Seminar Primer

by Andrew Warner on March 5th, 02013

“No Time Is There— The Digital Universe and Why Things Appear To Be Speeding Up”
Tuesday March 19, 02013 at the Herbst Theater, San Francisco

Photo: Joe Pugliese

George Dyson grew up playing with spare parts from some of the world’s earliest computers at the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study. His father, Freeman Dyson. . .   Read More

Reviving and Restoring Digital Art

by Charlotte Hajer on February 27th, 02013

With the ever-accelerating evolution of hardware and software, we stand to lose much more than reels of data. A vast collection of computer art risks slipping into digital darkness, as well.

Concerned about this impending loss, NYU student Matthew Epler recently founded the ReCode project: a community-driven effort to create an active archive. . .   Read More