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Blog Archive for the ‘Digital Dark Age’ Category

Billion-Year Mashup

by Kevin Kelly on September 5th, 02007

In today’s New York Times, author Timothy Ferris writes an ode to the multi-media disc of human activity that was sent into the cosmos on the Voyager 1 spacecraft. Despite the harsh — though stable — conditions in space, Ferris, who produced the gold plated disc, believes this record will last one billion years. If. . .   Read More

ISO standards go toward open source

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 4th, 02007

Some good news for data that wants to last beyond the next version of Microsoft Office…  The recent International Standards Organization (ISO) vote on whether to adopt Microsoft’s “Open XML” file format as a standard has narrowly failed for now.  In part they failed due to questions about the long term viability of a. . .   Read More

More data to be lost on Mars

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 3rd, 02007

A silica glass DVD will be traveling on the soon to be launched Phoenix Mission to Mars. I have a sneaking suspicion that it will add to the lineage of data lost on Mars:

What would a Martian traveler find on the disk? Assuming that he or she could figure out how to decode the. . .   Read More

Can archives support themselves?

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 2nd, 02007

We have always been told that “there is no financial model for archives.” This has begun to change a little in the entertainment industry with the ‘value added DVD’ that has a lot of historical outtakes etc. However much of our valuable past data still costs more money to store than can often be justified. . .   Read More

200 Year Software

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on July 13th, 02007

 
I was once again reminded of Dan Bricklin’s excellent piece on long term software and thought it was worth a mention here.  His basic point is that a governments software, should be as lasting and shared as its other civil infrastructure.  The article does a great job of showing the perils of entrusting all. . .   Read More

Seed Vault of Svalbard

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on May 11th, 02007

 

A little while ago the design for the Svalbard International Seed Vault was released (BBC article).  They are building a long term vault for seed stock preservation.  Interestingly they seem to have chosen the site mainly under the assumption that the planet will only get warmer in the next 200 years.  My understanding of the. . .   Read More

How To Use A Book

by Kevin Kelly on May 6th, 02007

Someday in the future our trouble with our current systems of networking and wireless and routers and protocols and software will seem as charming and obvious as… well as charmingly obvious as the hassles medieval monks may have had with the first books, if you can believe this cool video. It’s a glorious send. . .   Read More

The Mormon Vaults

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on April 9th, 02007

On January 2nd of 02007 Stewart Brand and I stepped into the cool deep past and unknown future of who begat who.

(picture: the granite genealogical vaults)

Since I began working on the 10,000 Year Clock project, and associated Library projects here at Long Now almost a decade ago, I have heard cryptic references. . .   Read More

Update to The Society Of American Archivists Kerfuffle

by Simone Davalos on March 21st, 02007

An update to this post about the Society of American Archivists disappearing their listserv archives, as posted on the Archivist’s Listerv:
To: A&A List

From: Elizabeth Adkins, SAA PresidentSubject: Appraisal of A&A List (1993-2006)

The SAA Council convened via conference call last night to review the feedback on our. . .   Read More

Public data and proprietary systems…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on March 20th, 02007

There is a good story in today’s Herald Tribune on how costly digital loss can be:
“JUNEAU, Alaska: Perhaps you know that sinking feeling when a single keystroke accidentally destroys hours of work. Now imagine wiping out a disk drive containing information for an account worth $38 billion (€29 billion).
That is what happened. . .   Read More