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Blog Archive for the ‘Digital Dark Age’ Category

Update to The Society Of American Archivists Kerfuffle

by Simone Davalos on March 21st, 02007

An update to this post about the Society of American Archivists disappearing their listserv archives, as posted on the Archivist’s Listerv:
To: A&A List

From: Elizabeth Adkins, SAA PresidentSubject: Appraisal of A&A List (1993-2006)

The SAA Council convened via conference call last night to review the feedback on our. . .   Read More

Public data and proprietary systems…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on March 20th, 02007

There is a good story in today’s Herald Tribune on how costly digital loss can be:
“JUNEAU, Alaska: Perhaps you know that sinking feeling when a single keystroke accidentally destroys hours of work. Now imagine wiping out a disk drive containing information for an account worth $38 billion (€29 billion).
That is what happened. . .   Read More

Oh The Irony: The Society of American Archivists Deletes Its Listserv Archive

by Simone Davalos on March 14th, 02007

From The Prelinger Library:
Now comes word that the SAA Council has decided that the archives of its own listserv are no longer worth saving and will be “disposed of” at the end of this month. After an appraisal of their value, they’ve determined the cost of keeping these bits is higher than their. . .   Read More

Cultural Memory and Digitization

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on March 13th, 02007

Interesting and quite long article in the Times Business Section on Sunday, beginning page about one of the downsides of digitization of books and similar printed resources. The thesis is that as we come to expect sources to be available digitally, and thus to rely on what we can find and search that way, those. . .   Read More

Sandisk archival memory

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 27th, 02007

As reported by Engaget, Sandisk is rumored to be developing 100 year archival memory cards… These may be just the thing for those family photos languishing on your ever detiorating CDRs. . .   Read More

Rosetta rounds Mars…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 27th, 02007

On February 24th the Rosetta spacecraft successfully completed its somewhat hairy slingshot around Mars with a copy of our Rosetta Disk on board. More here: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Rosetta/

Here is agreat photo forwarded by Stewart Brand shot from Rosetta as it swung by Mars. . .   Read More

Publish And Perish

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on December 1st, 02006

A piece in Forbes Magazine

Publish And Perish
Elisabeth Eaves, 12.01.06, 12:00 PM ET

Nothing is safe. Not your e-mails, digital photos or Word files. Not old newspapers or books. When it comes to storing information, everything will disappear into digital obsolescence or crumble to dust.

Even White House e-mails. . .   Read More

The Digital Ice Age

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on November 20th, 02006

 
A good article on the digital preservation problem in Popular Mechanics:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/industry/4201645.html?page=1

When the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz takes to sea, it carries more than a half-million files with diagrams of the propulsion, electrical and other systems critical to operation. Because this is the 21st. . .   Read More

Modern History Gap

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 13th, 02006

Storing information is easier than ever, but it’s also never been so easy to lose it — forever. We could end up with a modern history gap.

By Charles Piller, LA Times Staff Writer
September 13, 2006

Carter G. Walker remembers the day her memories vanished.

After sending an e-mail to her aunt, the. . .   Read More

‘One small step for man,’ 700-box tape loss for NASA

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 16th, 02006

Original recordings of Apollo moon missions are missing

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The U.S. government has misplaced the original recording of the first moon landing, including astronaut Neil Armstrong’s famous “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” a NASA spokesman said on Monday.

Armstrong’s famous space walk, seen by millions of. . .   Read More