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Blog Archive for the ‘Environment’ Category

Traditional Ecological Knowledge

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on August 4th, 02020

Archaeologist Stefani Crabtree writes about her work to reconstruct Indigenous food and use networks for the National Park Service. . .   Read More

The Past and Future of the Earth’s Oldest Trees

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on January 14th, 02020

Alex Ross has written a moving tribute to Long Now’s unofficial mascot, the bristlecone pine, in The New Yorker. What is most astonishing about Pinus longaeva is not the age of any single organism but the collective oldness and otherness of its entire community. No two super-elderly trees look alike, to . . .   Read More

Is Mars the Solution for Earth’s Problems?

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on December 9th, 02019

Geologist Marcia Bjornerud and Long Now’s Executive Director Alexander Rose debate about whether going to Mars is a viable long-term sustainability plan for human survival.

The role of 80-million year-old rocks in American slavery — Lewis Dartnell at The Interval

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on December 4th, 02019

When cretaceous-age rocks in the Southern US eroded over millions of years, they produced a uniquely rich, fertile soil that landowners realized was ideal for growing cash crops such as cotton. It was the soil from these rocks that slaves toiled over in the era of American slavery—and the same ground that . . .   Read More

Seminar Highlight: Martin Rees on How To Ensure a Brighter Future For the Planet

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on March 6th, 02019

“We need to think globally, we need to think rationally, and above all, we need to think long-term.” – Lord Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal, speaking at Long Now.

Watch video of the full talk here. . .   Read More

Mountain Observatories and a Return to Environmental Long Science

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on February 27th, 02019

Figure 1. Bristlecone pines on Mt. Washington, Snake Range, NV.

Wind cutting across my cheek, I marched across a grey, sharp limestone slope at treeline in the Great Basin. The tinkle of rock under shoe and a light whistle of air though bristlecone pine krummholtz were the only sounds heard in a stark, seemingly timeless. . .   Read More

Proximity to Resources Helps Explain Locations of Easter Island Monuments, a New Paper Argues

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on February 14th, 02019

A new paper by archaeologists Terry Hunt and Carl Lipo addresses one of the longstanding mysteries of the monuments of Easter Island: their location.

Four hundred of the statues, known as muai, are located miles away from where they were originally quarried, and sit on megalithic platforms, or ahu. An analysis of the locations of. . .   Read More

Thinking on a Global Scale to Conserve Endangered Species

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on July 26th, 02018

What makes a species invasive? What makes a species native? Ecologist and evolutionary biologist Chris Thomas on the need to think on a global, international scale when it comes to conservation. From Chris Thomas’s Long Now Seminar “Are We Initiating the Great Anthropocene Speciation Event,” which you can watch in full here.

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Is the Bristlecone Pine in Peril? An Interview with Great Basin Scientist Scotty Strachan

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on September 26th, 02017

Earlier this month, the bristlecone pine, one of the oldest and most isolated organisms on Earth, found itself in unfamiliar territory: in the headlines. News outlets such as the Chicago Tribune and the Washington Post reported that the bristlecone pine was “in peril” and threatened by extinction due to a warming climate. The news came. . .   Read More

The Industrial Sublime: Edward Burtynsky Takes the Long View

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on June 19th, 02017

The New Yorker recently profiled photographer, former SALT speaker, and 02016 sponsor of the Conversations at the Interval livestream Edward Burtynsky and his quest to document a changing planet in the anthropocene age.

“What I am interested in is how to describe large-scale human systems that impress themselves upon the land,” Burtynsky told New. . .   Read More

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