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Blog Archive for the ‘Essays’ Category

Essays by George Church and George Dyson from John Brockman’s New Book on A.I.

by Ahmed Kabil on February 19th, 02019

On Monday, February 25th, 02019, John Brockman (Founder of edge.org) will speak at Long Now about his new book on artificial intelligence, Possible Minds. Brockman will interview several of the contributors to the book, Rodney Brooks, Alison Gopnik and Stuart Russell on stage. Following the interviews, Kevin Kelly will host the Q&A. . .   Read More

The Future Right Around the Corner

by Ahmed Kabil on July 29th, 02018

Medium’s “Future Human” essay collection explores the scientific, technological, social and medical advances that are changing where and how we live. The collection features work by and about various members of the Long Now community, including past speakers (Andy Weir and Annalee Newitz), collaborators (the geneticist George Church), and staff (Long Now Editor Ahmed. . .   Read More

Danny Hillis publishes new essay on Long-Term Timekeeping in the Clock of the Long Now

by Ahmed Kabil on November 7th, 02017

Danny Hillis, Long Now co-founder and designer of the 10,000 Year Clock, has a new essay, “Long-Term Timekeeping in the Clock of the Long Now” in the book The Science of Time 2016: Time in Astronomy & Society, Past, Present and Future (published November 02017). The Science of Time 2016 presents “information. . .   Read More

The Future Will Have to Wait

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 6th, 02017

Eleven years ago this month, Pulitzer Prize winning author Michael Chabon published an article in Details Magazine about Long Now and the Clock.  It continues to be one of the best and most poignant pieces written to date…

The Future Will Have to Wait
Written by Michael Chabon for Details in January of 02006

I. . .   Read More

Teaching old dogs new tricks

by Austin Brown on February 20th, 02013

Humanity’s success as a species is often credited to intellect: our uniquely large and capable brains, evolved relatively recently in biological terms, allowed us to reason our way to technological innovation and ecological domination.

Or so the story goes. Stephen Asma, for Aeon Magazine, writes that we might owe an even deeper debt, however. . .   Read More

Civilization versus Forestation: Bristlecone Pines in the Anthropocene

by Charlotte Hajer on January 11th, 02013

“Trees and forests are repositories of time; to destroy them is to destroy an irreplaceable record of the Earth’s past.”
Whether we’ve grown up in the big city, a small town, or in the middle of the woods, most of us are familiar with the concept of tree rings. As children, we were. . .   Read More

Charles Mann on the State of the Species

by Austin Brown on November 26th, 02012

Charles Mann, a former SALT speaker, asks (and gets pretty deep into answering):
Why and how did humankind become “unusually successful”? And what, to an evolutionary biologist, does “success” mean, if self-destruction is part of the definition? Does that self-destruction include the rest of the biosphere? What are human beings in the grand. . .   Read More

Looking Back on the 21st Century

by Charlotte Hajer on November 5th, 02012

“These days, excess energy is very expensive, but for most people it just doesn’t matter. Most communities are locally self-sufficient. Everyone grows food using permaculture principles. Agricultural monoculture became deeply unfashionable during the great GM disease outbreaks of the 2030s. During the chaos, we were smart enough to keep the Internet going. Giving. . .   Read More

Conservation in the Age of Man

by Charlotte Hajer on May 11th, 02012

Nature is often resilient, not fragile. There is no wilderness unspoiled by man. Thoreau was a townie. Conservation, by many measures, is failing. If it is to survive, it has to change.
Environment & Energy Publishing recently featured an article on former SALT speaker Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for the Nature Conservancy who argues. . .   Read More