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Blog Archive for the ‘Genetics’ Category

The Neobiological Frontier: An Interview with Jane Metcalfe, Founder and CEO of NEO.LIFE

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on March 10th, 02020

Our March Seminar speaker is Jane Metcalfe, the Founder and CEO of NEO.LIFE, a digital media company she created in 02017 to explore the rapidly developing fields of biology and technology and how they are shaping the future of our species. Metcalfe is also the co-founder of WIRED. NEO.LIFE has just . . .   Read More

Photographer Captures the Surprising Beauty of Doomsday Seed Vaults

by Alice Riddell on March 4th, 02020

Artist and professor, Dornith Doherty, has traveled to Svalbard, Norway and to Sussex, England, among others, to document the ethereal nature of the seeds stored in these sub zero temperature vaults. The Millennium Seed Bank in Sussex now contains more than 2.3 billion seeds, spanning more than 40,000 different species. As reported . . .   Read More

2,000 Year-Old Date Seeds Finally Sprout

by Alice Riddell on February 19th, 02020

Six date-palm trees in Israel have sprouted two millennia after their seeds came into existence. As Sarah Zhang writes for The Atlantic, the collection of seeds recently planted all germinated in ancient archaeological sites and have been radiocarbon dated back to around A.D. 00047. The plants, named Adam, Jonah, Uriel, Boaz, Judith, . . .   Read More

Genetically Engineered Moths a Success in Cornell Crop Protection Study

by Alice Riddell on February 10th, 02020

A recent article in phys.org reports on a newly-published study on the use of genetically engineered moths to increase crop protection. The Cornell study documents the successful application and release of self-limiting, genetically engineered diamondback moths to fields of brassica crops.  “The diamondback moth, also known as Plutella xylostella, is highly . . .   Read More

How to Avoid a Negative Climate Future for the World’s Oceans

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on September 30th, 02019

On September 25th, the UN-led Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a landmark report on the impact of climate change on the world’s oceans. Over 100 authors from 36 countries analyzed the latest scientific findings on the cryosphere in a changing climate. The picture the report paints is dire, . . .   Read More

Revive & Restore Releases Ocean Genomics Horizon Scan

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on June 26th, 02019

Revive & Restore has released a 200-page report providing the first-of-its-kind assessment of genomic and biotech innovations to complement, enhance, and accelerate today’s marine conservation strategies.

Revive & Restore’s mission is to enhance biodiversity through the genetic rescue of endangered and extinct species. In pursuit of this and in. . .   Read More

Galloping, GIFs and Genes: Geneticists Store Moving Image in Living Bacteria

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on August 22nd, 02017

In 01872, California Governor Leland Stanford hired the famed photographer Eadweard Muybridge to settle a question of popular debate—whether all four of a horse’s feet ever left the ground when it galloped. The resulting series of photographs, Sallie Gardner at a Gallop, showed without a doubt that horses do indeed go airborne at. . .   Read More

Could Reviving the Woolly Mammoth Help Solve Climate Change?

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on March 28th, 02017

For over 100,000 years, wide swaths of the northern part of the globe were covered in grasslands where millions of bison, horses, and woolly mammoths grazed. Known as the Mammoth Steppe, it was the world’s most extensive biome, stretching from Spain to Canada, with more animal biomass than the African Savannah. With the. . .   Read More

Is the Great Auk a Candidate for De-Extinction?

by Stewart Brand on February 4th, 02016

On June 25 and 26, 2015, a meeting was held at the International Centre for Life in Newcastle, England, to discuss whether the extinct Great Auk–a once-common flightless pelagic bird known as “the penguin of the north”–might be a realistic candidate for bringing back to life using recent breakthroughs in genetic technology. . .   Read More

Beth Shapiro, “De-extinction Science”

by Danielle Engelman on June 1st, 02015

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

How to Clone a Mammoth
Monday May 11, 02015 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Shapiro Seminar page.
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Audio is up on the Shapiro Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
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De-extinction science. . .   Read More

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