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Blog Archive for the ‘History’ Category

What was the biggest empire in history?

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on November 17th, 02020

What was the biggest empire in history? The answer, writes Benjamin Plackett in Live Science, depends on whether you think in terms of fraction of living humans or number of living humans, revealing the challenges inherent in attempting to compare time periods: That’s without getting into the pros and cons of the . . .   Read More

The Role of Geology in US Presidential Elections

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on November 6th, 02020

In an article in Forbes, David Bressan writes that the giant rift in the USA’s political voting blocs is in part a consequence of collisions between continental plates, the literal giant rift that used to separate the two halves of North America, and recent glacial activity: The same region that had once . . .   Read More

The Data of Long-lived Institutions

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on October 21st, 02020

The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.  I want to lead you through some of the research that I’ve been doing on a meta-level around long-lived institutions, as well as some observations of the ways various systems have lasted for hundreds of thousands of years.  Long . . .   Read More

Charting Earth’s (Many) Mass Extinctions

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on September 28th, 02020

How many mass extinctions has the Earth had, really? Most people talk today as if it’s five, but where one draws the line determines everything, and some say over twenty. However many it might be, new mass extinctions seem to reveal themselves with shocking frequency. Just last year researchers argued for another . . .   Read More

Five New Discoveries Offer an Opportunity to Contemplate the Difference Between the Dead and Merely Dormant

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on September 22nd, 02020

Although the sensitive can feel it in all seasons, Autumn seems to thin the veil between the living and the dead. Writing from the dying cusp of summer and the longer bardo marking humankind’s uneasy passage into a new world age (. . .   Read More

Puzzling artifacts found at Europe’s oldest battlefield

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on August 16th, 02020

Bronze-Age crime scene forensics: newly discovered artifacts only deepen the mystery of a 3,300-year-old battle. What archaeologists previously thought to be a local skirmish looks more and more like a regional conflict that drew combatants in from hundreds of kilometers away…but why? Much like the total weirdness of the . . .   Read More

Discovery in Mexican Cave May Drastically Change the Known Timeline of Humans’ Arrival to the Americas

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on July 27th, 02020

Human history in the Americas may be twice long as long as previously believed — at least 26,500 years — according to authors of a new study at Mexico’s Chiquihuite cave and other sites throughout Central Mexico. According to the study’s lead author Ciprian Ardelean: “This site alone can’t be considered . . .   Read More

The Thames at Low Tide Reveals a Treasure Trove of Historical Tokens

by Alice Riddell on March 11th, 02020

As recently reported by Megan Specia for The New York Times, The Thames in London is hiding historical secrets on its shore, and certain explorers are eager to uncover them. At low tide, the river peels back to expose a beachy foreshore, and with it, long forgotten antiques and partially buried objects, dating as . . .   Read More

AI Unearths New Nazca Line in the Shape of a Humanoid Figure

by Alice Riddell on December 20th, 02019

The Nazca lines in Peru have baffled archaeologists for a century. Photo Credit: Jon Arnold Images Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo In Southern Peru, deep in the Nazca Desert, ancient etchings spread across the landscape. To an observer at ground level, they appear as lines cut into the desert surface. Most are straight, while . . .   Read More

A Trips Festival for the Digital Age

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on November 21st, 02019

Sónar seeks to bridge the worlds of art and technology, the popular and the avant garde, and club culture and cyberculture . . .   Read More

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