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Blog Archive for the ‘History’ Category

The Historical Land Practices Behind California’s Fires

by Jacob Kuppermann on September 1st, 02021

Fire has always been a part of California’s ecology. For millennia indigenous Californians managed ecosystems through controlled burns, but centuries of European & American fire suppression have turned the state’s forests into tinderboxes. Can we recover? . . . .   Read More

Long Now Member Ignite Talks 02020

by Casey Cripe on March 22nd, 02021

With thousands of members from all around the world, from artists and writers to engineers and farmers, the Long Now community has a wide range of perspectives, stories, and experience to offer. On October 20, 02020, we heard 12 of them in a curated set of short Ignite talks given by Long Now Members. . . .   Read More

“Lockdown Gardening” Is The New Archaeological Frontier in Britain

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on December 14th, 02020

Few things inspire someone to take a longer view on history than the possibility of treasure in their own backyard. With people taking to their gardens under pandemic lockdown came more than 47,000 reported archaeological finds in England and Wales. Meanwhile, the British government just announced their plans to broaden what counts as “. . .   Read More

What was the biggest empire in history?

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on November 17th, 02020

What was the biggest empire in history? The answer, writes Benjamin Plackett in Live Science, depends on whether you think in terms of fraction of living humans or number of living humans, revealing the challenges inherent in attempting to compare time periods: That’s without getting into the pros and cons of the . . .   Read More

The Role of Geology in US Presidential Elections

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on November 6th, 02020

In an article in Forbes, David Bressan writes that the giant rift in the USA’s political voting blocs is in part a consequence of collisions between continental plates, the literal giant rift that used to separate the two halves of North America, and recent glacial activity: The same region that had once . . .   Read More

The Data of Long-lived Institutions

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on October 21st, 02020

The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.  I want to lead you through some of the research that I’ve been doing on a meta-level around long-lived institutions, as well as some observations of the ways various systems have lasted for hundreds of thousands of years.  Long . . .   Read More

Charting Earth’s (Many) Mass Extinctions

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on September 28th, 02020

How many mass extinctions has the Earth had, really? Most people talk today as if it’s five, but where one draws the line determines everything, and some say over twenty. However many it might be, new mass extinctions seem to reveal themselves with shocking frequency. Just last year researchers argued for another . . .   Read More

Five New Discoveries Offer an Opportunity to Contemplate the Difference Between the Dead and Merely Dormant

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on September 22nd, 02020

Although the sensitive can feel it in all seasons, Autumn seems to thin the veil between the living and the dead. Writing from the dying cusp of summer and the longer bardo marking humankind’s uneasy passage into a new world age (. . .   Read More

Puzzling artifacts found at Europe’s oldest battlefield

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on August 16th, 02020

Bronze-Age crime scene forensics: newly discovered artifacts only deepen the mystery of a 3,300-year-old battle. What archaeologists previously thought to be a local skirmish looks more and more like a regional conflict that drew combatants in from hundreds of kilometers away…but why? Much like the total weirdness of the . . .   Read More

Discovery in Mexican Cave May Drastically Change the Known Timeline of Humans’ Arrival to the Americas

by Michael Garfield - Twitter: @michaelgarfield on July 27th, 02020

Human history in the Americas may be twice long as long as previously believed — at least 26,500 years — according to authors of a new study at Mexico’s Chiquihuite cave and other sites throughout Central Mexico. According to the study’s lead author Ciprian Ardelean: “This site alone can’t be considered . . .   Read More

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