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Blog Archive for the ‘History’ Category

How To Use A Book

by Kevin Kelly on May 6th, 02007

Someday in the future our trouble with our current systems of networking and wireless and routers and protocols and software will seem as charming and obvious as… well as charmingly obvious as the hassles medieval monks may have had with the first books, if you can believe this cool video. It’s a glorious send. . .   Read More

How to Build a Pyramid

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on April 29th, 02007

Forwarded to me by Stewart Brand is an amazing article from Archaology Magazine on the construction of the Great Pyramids. After analyzing a 25 year old micro-gravimetric study that showed a spiraling sub structure, it was determined that the pyramids were built with a spiraling ramp as part of the internal structure.

A microgravimetry. . .   Read More

100-Year Old Predictions from 1900

by Kevin Kelly on April 18th, 02007

The Ladies Home Journal of December 1900 ran a very brave list of predictions by one John Elfreth Watkins. Some are quite accurate, some wrong, and many are plain odd. Although grouped into 25 predictions, each one is a collection of not entirely related ideas. Some samples:

Prediction #1: There will probably be from 350. . .   Read More

The End of a 1,400-Year-Old Business

by Kevin Kelly on April 18th, 02007

There’s a very short but very telling story in Business Week on the demise of the longest-living company, based in Japan. After 14 centuries (!), this Buddhist temple construction company is going of out business. A few quotes:

The world’s oldest continuously operating family business ended its impressive run last year. Japanese temple. . .   Read More

Archaeologists Unearth German Stonehenge

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on March 29th, 02007

Forwarded to me by Danielle here at Long Now…

Complete article can be found here.

German experts on Thursday hailed Europe’s oldest astronomical observatory, discovered in Saxony-Anhalt last year, a “milestone in archaeological research” after the details of the sensational find were made public.
On Thursday, German experts toasted the discovery as a. . .   Read More

Brian Fagan – Catastrophic drought is coming back

by Kevin Kelly on March 10th, 02007

Catastrophic drought is coming back

There are two kinds of historians, Brian Fagan says, parachutists and truffle hunters. Parachutists command an overview of the landscape, while truffle hunters dig deeply to uncover marvelous treasures. Fagan is a parachutist. In his talk Fagan emphasized a wide view of human history as it unrolls in the landscape. . .   Read More

2,300 Year Old Solar Observatory in Peru

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on March 1st, 02007

The BBC is reporting on a site in Peru known as the Thirteen Towers. The thirteen notches line up with where the sun sets throughout the year.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6408231.stm. . .   Read More

Antikythera Redux

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 23rd, 02007

Nice piece by BBC on the latest work on the Antikythera Mechanism. This example of a 2000 year old astronomical computer being reconstructed out of relics from the bottom of the mediterranean is very encouraging for our Clock project…

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6191462.stm. . .   Read More

Stephen Lansing – “Perfect Order: A Thousand Years in Bali”

by Simone Davalos on January 12th, 02006

Hidden order in the Balinese “religion of water”

With lucid exposition and gorgeous graphics, anthropologist Stephen Lansing exposed the hidden structure and profound health of the traditional Balinese rice growing practices. The intensely productive terraced rice paddies of Bali are a thousand years old. So are the democratic subaks (irrigation cooperatives) that manage them, and. . .   Read More

Will Jarvis – “Time Capsule Behavior”

by Stewart Brand on May 16th, 02005

Time capsule secrets

High school classes and world’s fairs do it. Universities and builders and companies and municipalities do it. They bury little hoards of things they think people in the future will treasure— the future being ten years or ten thousand or never (most time capsules are immediately forgotten). Something strange, deep, and. . .   Read More