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Blog Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Deep Time

by Martin Rees on December 29th, 02018

Photo by Darv Robinson on Unsplash

This is the week when we recall what we’ve done last year, and resolve to use time better in the year to come. Indeed, in our everyday lives, time is a precious commodity. We can gain or lose it. We can save, spend or waste it. If our. . .   Read More

Michael Frachetti: Lessons from the Rise and Fall of Civilizations

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on March 26th, 02018

In 02011, anthropologist Michael Frachetti discovered a lost city that holds clues to how civilizations rise and fall when diverse communities integrate. From Michael Frachetti’s Long Now Seminar “Open Source Civilization and the Unexpected Origins of the Silk Road” which you can watch in full here. . .   Read More

Largest Early World Map Set to Be Unveiled at Rumsey Map Center

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on January 24th, 02018

Urbano Monte’s planisphere, digitally stitched together. Source: Rumsey Map Center

On July 25, 01585, near the end of a century of unprecedented change, four Japanese boys stopped in Milan on their way back home to Japan. They’d been sent as the first Japanese Embassy to Europe three years earlier by the Jesuit missionary. . .   Read More

Göbekli Tepe and the Worst Day in History

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on May 24th, 02017

Technological advances are revolutionizing the field of archaeology, resulting in new discoveries that are upending our previous understanding of the birth of civilization. Many scholars believe that few will be as consequential as Göbekli Tepe.

The ruins of Göbekli Tepe. Photograph by Vincent J. Musi.

IN 01963, anthropologists from the University of Chicago. . .   Read More

A Brief Economic History of Time

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on March 16th, 02017

“The age of exploration and the industrial revolution completely changed the way people measure time, understand time, and feel and talk about time,” writes Derek Thompson of The Atlantic. “This made people more productive, but did it make them any happier?”

In a wide-ranging essay touching upon the advent of the wristwatch, railroads, and. . .   Read More

Long Business: A Family’s Secret to a Millennia of Sake-Making

by Ahmed Kabil - Twitter: @ahmedkabil on February 7th, 02017

The Sudo family has been making sake for almost 900 years in Japan’s oldest brewery. Genuemon Sudo, who is the 55th generation of his family to carry on the tradition, said that at the root of Sudo’s longevity is a commitment to protecting the natural environment:

Sake is made from rice. Good rice. . .   Read More

Visualization of 5,000 Years of War

by Andrew Warner on March 16th, 02016

1100Lab has developed a visualization mapping all of the battles in Wikipedia in the last 5,000 years. Their blog details how they compiled the data, as well as other projects by the Netherlands based research and development firm. . .   Read More

Rick Prelinger, “Lost Landscapes of San Francisco, 10”

by Andrew Warner on December 22nd, 02015

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Lost Landscapes of San Francisco, 10
Wednesday December 9, 02015 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Prelinger Seminar page.
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Subscribe to our Seminar email list for updates and summaries. . .   Read More

“100 Years of Robot Art and Science in the Bay Area” Long Conversation November 20th 02015

by Andrew Warner on November 16th, 02015

On November 20, 02015, our Executive Director Alexander Rose is helping organize a free “Long Conversation” about the history of robots with UC Berkeley’s Ken Goldberg at “Friday Nights at the DeYoung”.
The event starts at 6:30, with doors at 6:00pm in the Koret Auditorium of the De Young Museum.
A “Long. . .   Read More

10,000 Years of Oral Narrative

by Charlotte Hajer on October 29th, 02015

Just off the coast of Australia, a few miles west of Perth, lie three small limestone islands. Today they’re a popular destination for boat trips and air taxis, but a local Aboriginal tribe tells stories of a time when these three isles were connected to the mainland by lush forest. One day, the stories. . .   Read More