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Blog Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Ancient Venture Capitalism and its Lessons for the Modern Economy

by Charlotte Hajer on September 24th, 02015

Our understanding of ancient civilizations can be spotty. Because not all cultural artifacts withstand the test of time, we have to piece together our portraits of these societies with partial clues, making inferences where needed to cover gaps in the archaeological record.
But one of these clues offers a remarkably detailed picture of economic life. . .   Read More

1,000 Year Old Recipe Effectively Kills MRSA (An Antibiotic-Resistant Superbug)

by Andrew Warner on April 2nd, 02015

A 1,000 year old treatment for eye infections, recreated from a recipe recorded in the 9th Century, killed up to 90% of MRSA bacteria, suggesting a new path of research against antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. The treatment is made up of onion, garlic, wine, and cow bile, and was recorded in Bald’s. . .   Read More

Richard Rhodes: Twilight of the Bombs — 02010 Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on March 5th, 02015

In September 02010 Richard Rhodes spoke about Twilight of the Bombs his history on nuclear weapons from the end of the Cold War to the 21st Century. Rhodes won the Pulitzer prize for The Making of the Atomic Bomb (01987) his first of four books chronicling the rise of nuclear science from the laboratory to. . .   Read More

Richard Rhodes: Hell and Good Company @ The Interval— March 10, 02015

by Mikl Em on March 3rd, 02015

March 10, 02015
Richard Rhodes (Pulitzer Prize winning historian)
Hell and Good Company at The Interval
Tickets are on sale now — these talks typically sell out
Our next event in the Conversations at The Interval features author Richard Rhodes discussing his new book Hell and Good Company: The Spanish Civil War and the World it. . .   Read More

Rick Prelinger: Lost Landscapes of San Francisco (02013) — Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on December 29th, 02014

Rick Prelinger photo by Cory Doctorow
In December 02013 film archivist Rick Prelinger presented Lost Landscapes of San Francisco 8 for our Seminars About Long-term Thinking series. It’s been an annual tradition in our series since 02008. Click here to watch the full video. We do not publish audio podcasts for Lost Landscapes. . .   Read More

World War II Sites, Then and Now

by Charlotte Hajer on October 22nd, 02014

About two years ago, we shared with you a set of enhanced photographs that visualized the transformation of World-War-II-era Leningrad into contemporary St. Petersburg.
We recently came across a similar photographic experiment in picturing historical change. The temporal lapse is similar: this interactive series compares 1940s images of European sites that played. . .   Read More

“Leonardo’s Brain” at The Interval, Sunday 10/12/02014

by Mikl Em on October 8th, 02014

This Sunday, October 12, The Interval hosts a special event to celebrate the posthumous release of Leonardo’s Brain: Understanding Da Vinci’s Creative Genius by Leonard Shlain. Leonardo’s Brain looks at the life, art and mind of 15th century Florentine polymath Leonardo da Vinci. Shlain’s book considers Da Vinci as a glimpse. . .   Read More

New Book Explores the Legacy of Paul Otlet’s Mundaneum

by Charlotte Hajer on September 23rd, 02014

In 02007, SALT speaker Alex Wright introduced us to Paul Otlet, the Belgian visionary who spent the first half of the twentieth century building a universal catalog of human knowledge, and who dreamed of creating a global information network that would allow anyone virtual access to this “Mundaneum.”
In June of this year, Wright released. . .   Read More

Richard Kurin: American History in 101 Objects — A Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on July 31st, 02014

In July 02013 The Smithsonian’s Richard Kurin shared relics familiar and obscure which evoke some of America’s most essential tales, from both before and after the states united. Twice a month we highlight a Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT) from our archives.

Video of the 12 most recent Seminars is free for. . .   Read More

World’s Oldest Comics: The Kanozero Petroglyphs

by Chia Evers on July 14th, 02014

In Understanding Comics, which Stewart Brand described as “a seminal work at the level of Edward Tufte’s Envisioning Information,” Scott McCloud defined comics as “Juxtaposed pictorial and other images in deliberate sequence, intended to convey information and/or to produce an aesthetic response in the viewer.” Using this definition, McCloud proposed several examples of. . .   Read More