Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Blog Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Rick Prelinger, “Lost Landscapes of San Francisco, 8”

by Andrew Warner on January 9th, 02014

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Lost Landscapes of San Francisco, 8
Tuesday December 17, 02013 – San Francisco

 
Video is up on the Prelinger Seminar page for Members.
*********************
Unlost San Francisco Life – a summary by Stewart Brand
“You are the soundtrack,” Prelinger. . .   Read More

David Rumsey’s Historic Maps of San Francisco on Display at SFO

by Charlotte Hajer on December 20th, 02013

There’s no place like an airport to ponder the notion of place in both its microscopic and macroscopic manifestations – in its continuities, and its evolutions.
Next time you fly in or out of San Francisco’s International Airport, take a stroll down to Terminal 2 (post-security), where a series of historic local maps. . .   Read More

3,700-Year Old Palatial Wine

by Charlotte Hajer on December 11th, 02013

The history of wine spans millennia: the ancient Romans considered the beverage a daily necessity, Phoenicians wrote the first textbooks on viticulture, and Egyptian pharaohs had wine cellars built into their burial tombs.

Now, recent archaeological findings from Israel promise to add new insights to our knowledge of wine drinking practices throughout the ages.

A. . .   Read More

Richard Kurin, “American Objects”

by Andrew Warner on December 5th, 02013

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

American History in 101 Objects
Monday November 18, 02013 – San Francisco
 
Video is up on the Kurin Seminar page for Members in HD and non-Members in SD.
*********************
Audio is up on the Kurin Seminar page. . .   Read More

Internet Archive Fundraiser – Lost Landscapes of San Francisco 8 – 2nd Showing

by Austin Brown on November 26th, 02013

Now in its eighth year, Rick Prelinger’s Lost Landscapes of San Francisco is almost always the largest of our Seminars About Long-term Thinking. Pre-sale tickets have sold out again at the Castro Theater and a few tickets will be released to the walk up line on the day of the show.
Those. . .   Read More

A 240-Year Old Programmable Computer Boy

by Charlotte Hajer on November 14th, 02013

In the late 18th century, Swiss clock- and watchmaker Pierre Jaquet Droz decided to advertise his business by building three automata, or mechanical robots, in the shape of young children. Still functional after almost 240 years, the machines are a marvel of mechanical engineering. “The Musician” is a girl who plays an organ – her eyes. . .   Read More

A visit to Star Axis

by Austin Brown on November 11th, 02013

Having climbed the staircase for some time, I stopped on a step that sent me back to the sky of twenty-five hundred years ago, the sky that loomed overhead when the Book of Job was written. I braced myself against the cool stone of the corridor that bracketed the staircase, and looked up through. . .   Read More

Richard Kurin Seminar Primer

by Andrew Warner on November 5th, 02013

“American History in 101 Objects”
Monday November 18, 02013 at the SFJAZZ Center, San Francisco

Richard Kurin, Under-Secretary of History, Art, and Culture at the Smithsonian, has been looking through all of the Smithsonian’s museums, archives, research centers–even their zoo–to find the objects that best tell the story of America. Inspired. . .   Read More

Conway’s Game of Life and Three Millennia of Human History

by Austin Brown on October 8th, 02013

In 01970 John Conway developed a computer program called The Game of Life. The idea behind it was that the process of biological life is, despite its apparent complexity, reduceable to a finite set of rules. The game is made up of a grid of squares, or “cells,” in one of two states: “alive” or. . .   Read More

Expanding the Definition of “Now”

by Charlotte Hajer on October 4th, 02013

“Humans are good at a lot of things, but putting time in perspective is not one of them. It’s not our fault – the spans of time in human history, and even more so in natural history, are so vast compared to the span of our life and recent history that it’s almost impossible. . .   Read More

1 3 4 5 6 7 19