Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Blog Archive for the ‘Infrastructure’ Category

American Infrastructure’s “Technical Debt”

by Ahmed Kabil on November 4th, 02019

With fires burning in California again, Alexis Madrigal has written a piece in The Atlantic on the technical debt embedded in America’s infrastructure: A kind of toxic debt is embedded in much . . .   Read More

Long-term Building in Japan

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 11th, 02019

When I started working with Stewart Brand over two decades ago, he told me about the ideas behind Long Now, and how we might build the seed for a very long-lived institution. . .   Read More

What a Prehistoric Monument Reveals about the Value of Maintenance

by Ahmed Kabil on September 5th, 02019

Members of Long Now London chalking the White Horse of Uffington, a 3000-year-old prehistoric hill figure in England. Photo by Peter Landers. Imagine, if you will, that you could travel back in time three thousand years to the late Bronze Age, with a bird’s eye view of a hill near . . .   Read More

The Nuclear Bunker Preserving Movie History

by Ahmed Kabil on June 22nd, 02017

During the Cold War, this underground bunker in Culpeper, Virginia was where the government would have taken the president if a nuclear war broke out. Now, the Library of Congress is using it to preserve all manner of films, from Casablanca to Harry Potter. The oldest films were made on nitrate, a fragile and highly. . .   Read More

These 1,000-Year-Old Windmills Work Perfectly, But Their Future is in Doubt

by Ahmed Kabil on April 10th, 02017

From National Geographic comes a video profiling the durable windmills of Nashtifan, Iran. These windmills constructed over a thousand years ago out of clay, straw and wood are not only still standing; they work just as well as they did when they were first built.

In designing and building the Clock of the Long Now. . .   Read More

Craters & Mudrock: Tools for Imagining Distant Future Finlands

by Vincent Ialenti on July 5th, 02016

Lake Lappajärvi (Photo Credit: Hannu Oksa)About 73 million years ago a meteorite crashed into what is now Finland’s Southern Ostrobothnia region. Today, serene Lake Lappajärvi rests in the twenty-three kilometer wide crater made in the distant past blast’s wake. Locals still enjoy boating to Lappajärvi’s Kärn. . .   Read More

James Fallows gives update to his “Civilization’s Infrastructure” Seminar

by Andrew Warner on November 5th, 02015

We under-imagine benefits and over-imagine problems with civilian infrastructure projects, yet we do the opposite with military infrastructure-scale weapons systems.  Both behaviors defy reason and cause harm.
— Stewart Brand
James Fallows recently wrote a piece for the Atlantic describing common bias in dealing with military infrastructure vs. public infrastructure, expanding on the. . .   Read More

James Fallows, “Infrastructure Investment Tricks”

by Andrew Warner on October 20th, 02015

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Civilization’s Infrastructure
Tuesday, October 6 02015 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Fallows Seminar page.
*********************
Audio is up on the Fallows Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
*********************

Infrastructure investment tricks – a summary. . .   Read More

Saul Griffith, “Green Infrastructure”

by Andrew Warner on October 3rd, 02015

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Infrastructure & Climate Change
Monday September 21, 02015 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Griffith Seminar page.
*********************

Audio is up on the Griffith Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
*********************

Green infrastructure – a summary. . .   Read More

Explore Urban Infrastructure at the MacroCity Conference, May 30-31

by Charlotte Hajer on April 15th, 02014

We rarely see in full the cities that we live in. Focused on our daily lives, urban dwellers are often only dimly aware of the numerous, enmeshed layers of critical infrastructure that quietly hum in the background to make modern life possible.
Come and explore the amazing stories and surprising histories to be found lurking. . .   Read More