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Blog Archive for the ‘Language’ Category

Shooting for 10,000 Autoglossonyms

by Jonathan Pool on February 27th, 02015

How many autoglossonyms do you know? Presumably, “English”; probably “español”, “français”, and “Deutsch”; perhaps “русский”, “日本語”, “עברית”, or “हिंदी”.

As you may have guessed, an autoglossonym is the name of a language in that language. While most people know a few of them, PanLex, as a Long Now project, aims to discover and document all of them. . .   Read More

Software as Language, as Object, as Art

by Chia Evers on November 25th, 02014

 

When The Long Now Foundation first began thinking about long-term archives, we drew inspiration from the Rosetta Stone, a 2000-year-old stele containing a Ptolemaic decree in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, Demotic script, and Ancient Greek. Our version of the Rosetta Stone, the Rosetta Disk, includes parallel texts in more than 1,500. . .   Read More

The Future of Language at The Interval: Tuesday July 22, 02014

by Mikl Em on July 18th, 02014

Laura Welcher, David Evan Harris, and Mandana Seyfeddinipur speak on Tuesday, July 22 at The Interval

This Tuesday at The Interval “The Future of Language” featuring Dr. Laura Welcher of Long Now’s Rosetta Project and Global Lives Project’s David Evan Harris, and special guest Dr Mandana Seyfeddinipur of the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme. . .   Read More

Algonquian Linguistic Atlas

by Austin Brown on May 5th, 02014

The Algonquian Linguistic Atlas is a project helping to preserve and celebrate North America’s linguistic diversity. The Algonquian family of languages have an estimated 50,000 speakers and the atlas allows viewers to explore the roughly 30 languages within it.

The project gives speakers and researchers a common tool to study and share the. . .   Read More

Lera Boroditsky: How Language Shapes Thought – A Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on March 5th, 02014

In October 02010 Lera Boroditsky spoke for Long Now on How Language Shapes Thought in a talk that resonates with the Rosetta Project, Long Now’s language preservation project.

SALT audio is free for everyone on our Seminar pages and via podcast. Long Now members can see all Seminar videos in HD. Video of the. . .   Read More

The Heirlooms of Language Through Temporary Tattoos and a Nickel Disk

by Catherine Borgeson on October 23rd, 02013

On Saturday October 19, 02013, Long Now participated in Exploratorium Market Days—a series of free, outdoor “mini-festivals” geared to educate the public through the science and art communities and museums. The theme of the month was “Heirlooms,” which focused on the “diverse treasures that we preserve and pass along to future generations.”
Together. . .   Read More

PanLex hits a billion translations

by Jonathan Pool on October 2nd, 02013

The PanLex project of The Long Now Foundation, which is building a database of words and phrases in the world’s languages, has recently passed the one-billion-translation mark. That means there are now over a billion pairs of words or phrases, such as “clock” in English and “ঘড়ী” in Assamese, that PanLex records as. . .   Read More

Forgotten Dictionaries of Indigenous Australian Languages Rediscovered

by Austin Brown on September 13th, 02013

Of the 145 indigenous languages spoken on the Australian continent, 110 are in danger of extinction, but a linguistics professor at the University of Sydney recently discovered a trove of documents that may help Australians better understand and preserve this diversity.

It started with just a pair of small notebooks from the 19th century. Michael. . .   Read More

Language may be much older than previously thought

by Austin Brown on July 30th, 02013

A recent study brings together archaeological, biological and linguistic research to posit that spoken language may be much older than previously thought. Authors Dan Dediu and Stephen C. Levinson argue that emerging research indicates ancestors of modern humans as far back as 500,000 years ago may have been capable of spoken language, in contrast. . .   Read More

Encapsulated Universes

by Charlotte Hajer on February 28th, 02013

In a recent conversation with Edge, Stanford Psychologist and former SALT speaker Lera Boroditsky explores intriguing – and still controversial – questions about the relationship between the language we speak, and the way we think about the world.

Weaving her thoughts together with examples from a variety of different languages, Boroditsky shows us that languages differ in. . .   Read More