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Blog Archive for the ‘Long-term Thinking’ Category

Politics or foresight

by Stuart Candy on July 25th, 02007

…take your pick.

(Thanks to Jamais Cascio for spotting this.)

From an interview with US Secretary of State, Condoleeza Rice, by BusinessWeek magazine:
BusinessWeek: Would you consider a position in business or on Wall Street?
Condoleezza Rice: I don’t know what I’ll do long-term. I’m a terrible long-term planner.
~ “A. . .   Read More

Art in geological time

by Stuart Candy on July 24th, 02007

Domain Field (02003) :: image at antonygormley.com
I recently met British sculptor Antony Gormley at the EGS summer session in Saas-Fee, Switzerland. Most of his works interpret the human body, and many of them replicate actual bodies — frequently his own. A deeply thoughtful presentation of his work during an evening seminar impressed on me. . .   Read More

Where was the moon 3.2 billion years ago?

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on July 17th, 02007

My friend Camron sent me this great geeky blog piece on a bedding plain that was laid down by tides created by our moon 3.2 billion years ago. It not only shows the moon affects, but it also shows us it was in a lower orbit then. . .   Read More

200 Year Software

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on July 13th, 02007

 
I was once again reminded of Dan Bricklin’s excellent piece on long term software and thought it was worth a mention here.  His basic point is that a governments software, should be as lasting and shared as its other civil infrastructure.  The article does a great job of showing the perils of entrusting all. . .   Read More

Thinking long, building big

by Stuart Candy on July 11th, 02007

Projected view of New York’s skyline after constructionof Ground Zero Memorial :: image from timesonline.co.uk

Here at The Long Now we’re always interested in large-scale, ambitious architecture projects, partly because, of course, designing and building the 10,000-year Clock of the Long Now offers a few large-scale challenges of. . .   Read More

Re-photography

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on July 10th, 02007

Muir Glacier as seen on August 13, 1941 (left) and August 31, 2004 (right).

Photography has now been around long enough that re-photography of certain sites can show over a century of change. Recent photographs depicting glacier retreat, like the ones above, have become the canary in the mineshaft of climate change discussion. Just. . .   Read More

Catastrophe a good bet?

by Stuart Candy on July 6th, 02007

photo of flooded Thames by elyob

The Long Now’s Long Bets project asks us, active bettors and wider public alike, to think more deeply and carefully about the medium- to long-term future than our assumptions (and busy schedules) might otherwise allow.

Nudging our culture towards assuming greater responsibility for addressing (and creating) possible. . .   Read More

The Long You

by Stuart Candy on July 3rd, 02007

Making long-term thinking viable depends partly on rendering slow processes perceptible, compressing them onto a scale we can relate to more easily. Given that the quintessential long-now change processes (geology, deep culture etc) extend over many human lifetimes, a similar challenge is to make the passage of time more personal.

Here’s an. . .   Read More

Westinghouse Time Capsule Book

by Kevin Kelly on June 28th, 02007

The Westinghouse Time Capsule was the object that has defined time capsules since then: a container of objects from the present buried to be resurrected at a specified date in the future. To commenorate its burial during the 1939 World’s Fair and to act as a manual for those who might dig it up. . .   Read More

The (other) Long View

by Kevin Kelly on June 18th, 02007

Leave it to the BBC to take the long view. Similar to our Long View chiefly in name, The Long View is a radio program hosted by
“Jonathan Freedland [who] looks for the past behind the present, and explores a moment in history which illuminates a contemporary debate.”
Here’s a list of some of. . .   Read More