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Blog Archive for the ‘Long-term Thinking’ Category

Where Time Begins

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on November 20th, 02014

Last year I had the opportunity to give a talk and tour of the US Naval Observatory in Washington DC at the invitation of Demetrios Matsakis, the director of the U.S. Naval Observatory’s Time Service department.  The Naval Observatory hosts the largest collection of precise frequency standards in the world, and uses them to, among […]

Growing A Book For One Hundred Years

by Catherine Borgeson on October 28th, 02014

It started with a seed planted in the mind of Scottish artist Katie Paterson when she made the connection between tree rings and chapters of books. Now several years in the making, Paterson’s vision will unfold over the next century in her artwork Future Library–an ambitious and evolving piece that will outlive Paterson and most […]

How We Got To Now: new PBS show starring Steven Johnson

by Andrew Warner on October 15th, 02014

Tonight, October 15th 02014, former SALT Speaker Steven Johnson’s new TV series premieres on PBS. The show, “How We Got To Now”, is co-produced by PBS and BBC, and focuses on different themes showing how long cumulative efforts can result in massive systemic change. The first of the six episodes, “Clean”, focuses on. . .   Read More

What Nuclear Waste Management Can Teach Us About Deep Time

by Charlotte Hajer on October 4th, 02014

Many suggest we have entered the Anthropocene – a new geologic epoch ushered in by humanity’s own transformations of Earth’s climate, erosion patterns, extinctions, atmosphere and rock record. In such circumstances, we are challenged to adopt new ways of living, thinking and understanding our relationships with our planetary environment. To do so, anthropologist Richard Irvine […]

David Eagleman: Six Easy Steps to Avert the Collapse of Civilization — Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on August 22nd, 02014

In April 02010 author and neuroscientist David Eagleman proposed several internet-enabled ways to avoid the collapse of civilization. Eagleman is a Guggenheim Fellow known for his research on time perception and synesthesia; his books include the best-seller Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives. Twice a month we highlight a Seminar About Long-term. . .   Read More

Adrian Hon, “Future Artifacts”

by Andrew Warner on August 4th, 02014

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

A History of the Future in 100 Objects
Wednesday July 16, 02014 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Hon Seminar page.
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Audio is up on the Hon Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast. . .   Read More

How Hard Should the Turing Test Be?

by Austin Brown on July 29th, 02014

It seems clear that computers are becoming more intelligent, but in the face of this fact, our definition of intelligence itself seems increasingly blurry. The University of Reading recently made an announcement exemplifying this trend:
The 65 year-old iconic Turing Test was passed for the very first time by computer program Eugene Goostman during. . .   Read More

Ecological Anachronisms

by Austin Brown on June 24th, 02014

Evolution is a diligent innovator and the diversity it has achieved offers the curious seemingly unending marvels. In some cases, though, a particular innovation might not make much sense on initial consideration. In those cases, zooming out in time can be instructive.

Whit Bronaugh, writing for American Forests, demonstrates this using the concept of ecological. . .   Read More

Mapping the Long Walk – An Out of Eden Update

by Chia Evers on June 20th, 02014

In January 02013, we introduced you to slow journalist Paul Salopek, who is retracing the steps of our earliest human ancestors in a seven-year journey Out of Eden. Since then, Salopek has covered more than 4,000 kilometers (nearly 2,500 miles), from in Eastern Ethiopia to East Jerusalem. His route was, intentionally, sketched. . .   Read More

Multi-Millennial Portraits: The Deep Time Photography and Writing of Rachel Sussman

by Catherine Borgeson on June 4th, 02014

The oldest living things in the world are a record and celebration of the past, a call to action in the present, and a barometer of our future, writes artist and SALT speaker Rachel Sussman in The Oldest Living Things in the World.

When Rachel spoke for Long Now in 02010 her book on organisms. . .   Read More

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