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Blog Archive for the ‘Millennial Precedent’ Category

Long-Lived Institutions

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on June 27th, 02019

The Sagrada Familia Catholic Church in Barcelona, Spain. The Catholic Church is one of the longest-lived institutions in human history.

The Long Now Foundation was founded in 01996 with the idea to build a 10,000 year clock — an icon to long-term thinking that might inspire people to engage more deeply with. . .   Read More

Edge’s John Brockman Interviews Alexander Rose

by Ahmed Kabil on April 24th, 02019

Executive Director Alexander Rose recently sat down with John Brockman of Edge.org to discuss Long Now. (Brockman recently gave a talk at Long Now in February about A.I.).
There are almost no artifacts that have been built for very long periods of time. With things like the pyramids or Stonehenge—we knew the. . .   Read More

Long Now Lessons From Notre Dame

by Ahmed Kabil on April 17th, 02019

In the hours after news broke that the Cathedral of Notre Dame suffered extensive fire damage, many found hope in a story that circulated on social media about a centuries-old protocol the fire department in Paris followed when battling the fire. The story originated with Twitter. . .   Read More

Proximity to Resources Helps Explain Locations of Easter Island Monuments, a New Paper Argues

by Ahmed Kabil on February 14th, 02019

A new paper by archaeologists Terry Hunt and Carl Lipo addresses one of the longstanding mysteries of the monuments of Easter Island: their location.

Four hundred of the statues, known as muai, are located miles away from where they were originally quarried, and sit on megalithic platforms, or ahu. An analysis of the locations of. . .   Read More

The 26,000-Year Astronomical Monument Hidden in Plain Sight

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 29th, 02019

On the western flank of the Hoover Dam stands a little-understood monument, commissioned by the US Bureau of Reclamation when construction of the dam began in 01931. The most noticeable parts of this corner of the dam, now known as Monument Plaza, are the massive winged bronze sculptures and central flagpole which are often. . .   Read More

These 1,000-Year-Old Windmills Work Perfectly, But Their Future is in Doubt

by Ahmed Kabil on April 10th, 02017

From National Geographic comes a video profiling the durable windmills of Nashtifan, Iran. These windmills constructed over a thousand years ago out of clay, straw and wood are not only still standing; they work just as well as they did when they were first built.

In designing and building the Clock of the Long Now. . .   Read More

Craters & Mudrock: Tools for Imagining Distant Future Finlands

by Vincent Ialenti on July 5th, 02016

Lake Lappajärvi (Photo Credit: Hannu Oksa)About 73 million years ago a meteorite crashed into what is now Finland’s Southern Ostrobothnia region. Today, serene Lake Lappajärvi rests in the twenty-three kilometer wide crater made in the distant past blast’s wake. Locals still enjoy boating to Lappajärvi’s Kärn. . .   Read More

Member Discount for “Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art”

by Andrew Warner on October 23rd, 02015

Long Now is proud to be a co-partner with YBCA in showing “Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art”. The film will be shown at 7:30 PM on Thursday October 29 and 2:00 PM on Sunday November 1 at YBCA’s Screening Room. Troublemakers unearths the history of land art, featuring a cadre of renegades who sought…  Read More

2,000-Year Old Termite Mounds Found in Central Africa

by Charlotte Hajer on August 28th, 02015

Much like ants, termites are a testament to the adage that a whole is greater than the sum of its parts. A single termite is an almost translucent creature, no more than a few millimeters long. But put several thousand of them together, and they become capable of building expansive structures, some reaching up as…  Read More

No Apocalypse Necessary

by Austin Brown on October 14th, 02013

Writing for Aeon Magazine, Colin Dickey, visited the Svalbard Global Seed Vault and discusses the apocalyptic rhetoric often associated with the project. He points out that apocalyptic thinking, while sometimes an effective motivator, can be a barrier to long-term thinking.
This obsession with impending disaster suggests that we see nature on a particularly human. . .   Read More