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Blog Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

The Global Tree Restoration Potential

by Ahmed Kabil on July 9th, 02019

Earlier this month, a study appeared in Science that found that a global reforestation effort could capture 205 gigatons of CO2 over the next 40-100 years—two thirds of all the CO2 humans have generated since the industrial revolution:

The restoration of trees remains among the most effective strategies for climate change mitigation. We. . .   Read More

Legacy of Female Primatologists Jane Goodall & Dian Fossey — Elizabeth Lonsdorf at The Interval

by Ahmed Kabil on June 16th, 02019

Primatologist Elizabeth Lonsdorf shares the story of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, two of the three ‘Trimates’ who revolutionized the field of primatology with their studies of gorillas and chimpanzees.

From the Conversation at The Interval, “Growing Up Ape: The Long-term Science of Studying Our Closest Living Relatives” by. . .   Read More

Bruno Latour Mounts a Defense of Science

by Ahmed Kabil on June 8th, 02019

Earlier this year, The New York Times published a profile of philosopher Bruno Latour on the occasion of the publication of his new book, Down to Earth. “He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority,” Ava Kofman writes. “Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?”

What journalists, scientists and other. . .   Read More

What Trees Tell Us

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02019

The rings of centuries-old trees are offering scientists a more complete picture of climate change and the role of humans in causing it. . .   Read More

Former Seminar Speaker Stephen Pyne Interviewed in Piece About California Wildfires

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02019

Former Seminar speaker Stephen Pyne was recently interviewed for a piece in New York Magazine about what it means to build permanent structures in California—a state that was always meant to continually burn and shake. 

So quickly, according to the fire historian Stephen Pyne, we forget the threat is even real. “We think. . .   Read More

Ancient Native Legend About a Great Flood is True, Study Finds

by Ahmed Kabil on May 9th, 02019

Geologists have verified that the legend of a great flood passed down orally by the Pacific Northwest’s Klallam people for 2,700 years is not a myth, but a warning. A new study has found that as many as five tsunamis hit an ancient Klallam village in present-day Washington state.

The evidence comes. . .   Read More

Past Interval Speaker Geoff Manaugh on an Emerging Fault System in the Eastern Sierra

by Ahmed Kabil on April 20th, 02019

Past Interval speaker Geoff Manaugh has written a feature for the May issue of WIRED about the Walker Lane in the Eastern Sierra, “an emerging fault system along the Nevada border [that] is shaking up the tech industry’s latest frontier—and only a small group of scientists is paying attention.”

The Long Now Foundation and a Great Basin Mountain Observatory for Long Science

by Laura Welcher on February 27th, 02019

Figure 1. Mt. Washington in the Snake Range, NV, with bristlecone pines. Photo: Connie Millar

About 15 years ago, my work unexpectedly collided with mountain climate science research when the nonprofit organization I work for, The Long Now Foundation, acquired Mt. Washington in eastern Nevada (Fig. 1). Not the whole mountain, but important parts of. . .   Read More

Mountain Observatories and a Return to Environmental Long Science

by Ahmed Kabil on February 27th, 02019

Figure 1. Bristlecone pines on Mt. Washington, Snake Range, NV.

Wind cutting across my cheek, I marched across a grey, sharp limestone slope at treeline in the Great Basin. The tinkle of rock under shoe and a light whistle of air though bristlecone pine krummholtz were the only sounds heard in a stark, seemingly timeless. . .   Read More

How to Run a 500-Year Long Science Experiment

by Ahmed Kabil on February 5th, 02019

Last week, The Atlantic’s Sarah Zhang profiled a University of Edinburgh science experiment that began in 02014 and—if everything goes according to plan—will conclude in 02514.

The experiment is studying the longevity of bacteria, which can remain viable well past the lifespan of humans.

Physically, the 500-year experiment consists of 800. . .   Read More

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