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Blog Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

A Useful Primer for Complexity Science

by Alice Riddell on February 6th, 02020

Complexity Explained is a new project that distills key aspects of complexity science, also known as complex science systems, into an easy-to-digest, interactive visual explainer. The explainer is also available as a free booklet, downloadable at this link. . .   Read More

New Images of the Sun Captured by Impressive New Telescope in Hawaii

by Alice Riddell on January 31st, 02020

In a piece for The New York Times, Dennis Overbye describes the remarkable images of the sun captured by the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii. Our closest star, never before seen in such detail, now resembles a “boiling pot of popcorn” thanks to the 158 inches . . .   Read More

How Salvaging Ancient Shipwrecks Might Lead us to Unveil the Mystery of Dark Matter

by Alice Riddell on November 11th, 02019

In a Long Now talk on dark matter and dark energy, theoretical astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan said that “we simultaneously know quite a lot, and not a lot” about the key ingredients of our universe. What we do know is that dark energy makes up about&. . .   Read More

The Amazon is not the Earth’s Lungs

by Ahmed Kabil on September 1st, 02019

Peter Brannen, writing in The Atlantic, details why a popular claim being made on social media isn’t true—not to downplay the impact of the fires, but to educate audiences on how the various systems of our planet interact   Read More

The Global Tree Restoration Potential

by Ahmed Kabil on July 9th, 02019

Earlier this month, a study appeared in Science that found that a global reforestation effort could capture 205 gigatons of CO2 over the next 40-100 years—two thirds of all the CO2 humans have generated since the industrial revolution:

The restoration of trees remains among the most effective strategies for climate change mitigation. We. . .   Read More

Legacy of Female Primatologists Jane Goodall & Dian Fossey — Elizabeth Lonsdorf at The Interval

by Ahmed Kabil on June 16th, 02019

Primatologist Elizabeth Lonsdorf shares the story of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, two of the three ‘Trimates’ who revolutionized the field of primatology with their studies of gorillas and chimpanzees.

From the Conversation at The Interval, “Growing Up Ape: The Long-term Science of Studying Our Closest Living Relatives” by. . .   Read More

Bruno Latour Mounts a Defense of Science

by Ahmed Kabil on June 8th, 02019

Earlier this year, The New York Times published a profile of philosopher Bruno Latour on the occasion of the publication of his new book, Down to Earth. “He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority,” Ava Kofman writes. “Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?”

What journalists, scientists and other. . .   Read More

What Trees Tell Us

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02019

The rings of centuries-old trees are offering scientists a more complete picture of climate change and the role of humans in causing it. . .   Read More

Former Seminar Speaker Stephen Pyne Interviewed in Piece About California Wildfires

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02019

Former Seminar speaker Stephen Pyne was recently interviewed for a piece in New York Magazine about what it means to build permanent structures in California—a state that was always meant to continually burn and shake. 

So quickly, according to the fire historian Stephen Pyne, we forget the threat is even real. “We think. . .   Read More

Ancient Native Legend About a Great Flood is True, Study Finds

by Ahmed Kabil on May 9th, 02019

Geologists have verified that the legend of a great flood passed down orally by the Pacific Northwest’s Klallam people for 2,700 years is not a myth, but a warning. A new study has found that as many as five tsunamis hit an ancient Klallam village in present-day Washington state.

The evidence comes. . .   Read More

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