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Blog Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

Ancient trees find life online

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 14th, 02008

 
Laura Welcher just pointed me to  this Google Earth Outreach project on the ancient Bristlcone Pine tree.  These are the same trees that live atop our Nevada Clock site.  Much of the data comes from our friends over at the Arizona Tree Ring Lab that have been studying the trees on our property.  By studying. . .   Read More

Blue eyed Adam

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 4th, 02008

Genetic Archeology (very cool site in its own right) is reporting new research that suggests that all blue eyed people stem from a common ancestor 6-10,000 years ago.
“They have all inherited the same switch at exactly the same spot in their DNA” says Professor Eiberg.  Brown-eyed individuals, by contrast, have considerable. . .   Read More

The century palm

by Stuart Candy on January 17th, 02008

Image: John Dransfield / Royal Botanic Gardens via AP

Associated Press reports (via Discovery Science):
A self-destructing palm tree that flowers once every 100 years and then dies has been discovered on the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar, botanists said Thursday.
[…]
Local villagers have known about it for years although none had seen it in. . .   Read More

Nanotech in the time of Christ

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 11th, 02008

Wired’s Blog has a nifty piece on the two millennia old Demascus steel process replete with quotes from a Nobel laureate and Neal Stephenson:
Damascus swords — sharp enough to slice a falling piece of silk in half, strong enough to split stones without dulling — owe their legendary qualities to carbon nanotubes, says chemist and. . .   Read More

On the 8th day, Venter creates life

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on October 19th, 02007

Genes of micro-organisms are being modified to create something new
 
The BBC reports on our upcoming seminar speaker Craig Venter’s recent advances in creating life. Attendees of Juan Enriquez’ illuminating talk “Mapping Life” also heard about this research and Venter’s success in “jump starting” life by injecting DNA from one cell. . .   Read More

100,000 Year Living Microbe

by Kevin Kelly on October 10th, 02007

(Frozen bacteria found by Richard Hoover in the ice of the Fox permafrost tunnel)

From New Scientist:

Microbes can survive trapped inside ice crystals, under 3 kilometres of snow, for more than 100,000 years, a new study suggests. The study bolsters the case that life may exist on distant, icy worlds in our own. . .   Read More

Long Term Thinking Uses Separate Neural System

by Kevin Kelly on August 10th, 02007

From Science Blogs comes this news about how long term thinking uses separate neural pathways in our brains than short term thinking.

So why do people take out sub-prime loans? Don’t they realize that they won’t be able to afford the ensuing 28 years of mortgage payments? I think a big part. . .   Read More

Genetic diversity on the decline…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 8th, 02007

By studying mitochondrial DNA from samples over 1000 years old to the present, scientists have good evidence that human genetic diverstiy is on the decline. You can see the article from the Royal Society here (a great source of many forms of long term science in general).
“In a study covering five different periods of. . .   Read More

Long-term agricultural experiments

by Stephanie Gerson on August 1st, 02007

Add England’s Rothamsted Experimental Station to the list of long-term experiments.
“Rothamsted’s Classical experiments are unique in their age and variety, and are, deservedly, world-famous. There are many other experiments on our Rothamsted and Woburn farms that, by conventional standards, can justifiably be described as ‘long-term’. Most of these were. . .   Read More

Three of the longest scientific experiments still going

by Kevin Kelly on May 2nd, 02007

It just so happens that three of the longest running scientific experiments are located in the foyers of university physics departments. These three long-running tests were first reported as a set in a 1984 article in the European Journal of Physics. One of them, the pitch drop has achieved some internet fame. But it. . .   Read More