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Blog Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

On the 8th day, Venter creates life

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on October 19th, 02007

Genes of micro-organisms are being modified to create something new
 
The BBC reports on our upcoming seminar speaker Craig Venter’s recent advances in creating life. Attendees of Juan Enriquez’ illuminating talk “Mapping Life” also heard about this research and Venter’s success in “jump starting” life by injecting DNA from one cell. . .   Read More

100,000 Year Living Microbe

by Kevin Kelly on October 10th, 02007

(Frozen bacteria found by Richard Hoover in the ice of the Fox permafrost tunnel)

From New Scientist:

Microbes can survive trapped inside ice crystals, under 3 kilometres of snow, for more than 100,000 years, a new study suggests. The study bolsters the case that life may exist on distant, icy worlds in our own. . .   Read More

Long Term Thinking Uses Separate Neural System

by Kevin Kelly on August 10th, 02007

From Science Blogs comes this news about how long term thinking uses separate neural pathways in our brains than short term thinking.

So why do people take out sub-prime loans? Don’t they realize that they won’t be able to afford the ensuing 28 years of mortgage payments? I think a big part. . .   Read More

Genetic diversity on the decline…

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 8th, 02007

By studying mitochondrial DNA from samples over 1000 years old to the present, scientists have good evidence that human genetic diverstiy is on the decline. You can see the article from the Royal Society here (a great source of many forms of long term science in general).
“In a study covering five different periods of. . .   Read More

Long-term agricultural experiments

by Stephanie Gerson on August 1st, 02007

Add England’s Rothamsted Experimental Station to the list of long-term experiments.
“Rothamsted’s Classical experiments are unique in their age and variety, and are, deservedly, world-famous. There are many other experiments on our Rothamsted and Woburn farms that, by conventional standards, can justifiably be described as ‘long-term’. Most of these were. . .   Read More

Three of the longest scientific experiments still going

by Kevin Kelly on May 2nd, 02007

It just so happens that three of the longest running scientific experiments are located in the foyers of university physics departments. These three long-running tests were first reported as a set in a 1984 article in the European Journal of Physics. One of them, the pitch drop has achieved some internet fame. But it. . .   Read More

Frans Lanting, The deep past in the remote present

by Stewart Brand on April 30th, 02007

The deep past in the remote present

It began on a New Jersey beach. Frans Lanting was photographing horseshoe crabs for a story about how they are being ground up for eel bait and at the same time their blood is used for drug testing—a $100 million industry. The crabs have primordial eyesight, which. . .   Read More

Kevin Kelly – “The Next 100 Years of Science: Long-term Trends in the Scientific Method.”

by Simone Davalos on March 13th, 02006

Recursion drives science

The co-founding editor of “Wired” magazine and author of OUT OF CONTROL is working on a new book on “what technology wants.” His research led to the first-ever history of scientific methodology. Starting from this long-term view of science’s past transformation, he speculates on how the practice of. . .   Read More

Esther, Freeman, and George Dyson – “The Difficulty In Looking Far Ahead”

by Simone Davalos on October 5th, 02005

Finessing the future

Instead of one podium there were four chairs on the stage of Wednesday’s seminar. In three seats, three Dysons: Esther, George and Freeman. They were appearing together on stage for the first time. The fourth held Stewart Brand who led the three through an evening of queries. The questions came from. . .   Read More

Michael West – “The Prospects of Human Life Extension”

by Stewart Brand on November 15th, 02004

Ever longer life

Our germline cells (eggs and sperm) are already immortal. What if the rest of the cells of our body could acquire the same ability? Tissue by tissue, one degenerative disease after another, it could gradually happen in the course of one or two human generations. When it does happen, what we mean. . .   Read More