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Blog Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Stewart Brand Keynote Video from 02014 Evernote Conference

by Andrew Warner on November 19th, 02014

On October 3rd 02014, Stewart Brand delivered the keynote address for the Evernote EC4 conference. Evernote is a service that allows people to collect information, notes, bookmarks, and create a personal searchable database with this collection.

Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote, has been a fan of Long Now for years, which inspired him to introduce. . .   Read More

Ambition: Rosetta Mission Video

by Andrew Warner on November 10th, 02014

This Wednesday, November 12 02014, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta Mission will deploy the Philae lander onto the 67P Comet after over a decade-long journey.  When this mission was first conceived, the ESA asked to put one of Long Now’s Rosetta Disks on the craft, making the Rosetta Probe the first off. . .   Read More

How We Got To Now: new PBS show starring Steven Johnson

by Andrew Warner on October 15th, 02014

Tonight, October 15th 02014, former SALT Speaker Steven Johnson’s new TV series premieres on PBS. The show, “How We Got To Now”, is co-produced by PBS and BBC, and focuses on different themes showing how long cumulative efforts can result in massive systemic change. The first of the six episodes, “Clean”, focuses on. . .   Read More

Mapping the Long Walk – An Out of Eden Update

by Chia Evers on June 20th, 02014

In January 02013, we introduced you to slow journalist Paul Salopek, who is retracing the steps of our earliest human ancestors in a seven-year journey Out of Eden. Since then, Salopek has covered more than 4,000 kilometers (nearly 2,500 miles), from in Eastern Ethiopia to East Jerusalem. His route was, intentionally, sketched. . .   Read More

Long Now Seminar Videos for Everyone

by Mikl Em on January 6th, 02014

We begin 02014 with some big news about online access to our Seminars About Long-term Thinking (SALT). Now for the first time on Longnow.org there is full, free public access to video of the twelve most recent Long Now Seminars. That’s a whole year’s worth, and as new Seminars are added. . .   Read More

“Climate Change and Us” Event Video Now Live

by Andrew Warner on December 23rd, 02013

Rarely do we get to hear directly from the scientists who compile, analyze, and synthesize the most recent climate change data. On December 13th, swissnex San Francisco, in partnership with The Long Now Foundation, hosted an event that explained the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s most recent report, and what types of solutions would. . .   Read More

The Interval at Long Now: Time on the Menu

by Mikl Em on October 10th, 02013

Photo by Catherine Borgeson

Progress on the Long Now Salon continues. We have told you a lot about the design and building of the space (most recently about our cardboard prototyping night) and the library we are building for it. But while renovating the physical space is an important aspect of opening this new venue. . .   Read More

Stewart Brand at SF Premiere of Pandora’s Promise – June 14th, 02013

by Austin Brown on June 11th, 02013

Pandora’s Promise, a new documentary by filmmaker Robert Stone, takes a look at nuclear power as a possible player in the mix of technologies we’ll need to meet energy demand without pushing atmospheric CO2 beyond safe levels. Long Now co-founder Stewart Brand and other former SALT speakers Mark Lynas, Gwyneth Cravens and. . .   Read More

10 Petabytes and Growing: The Internet Archive

by Austin Brown on June 3rd, 02013

The Internet Archive seeks to offer universal access to all knowledge.  Jonathan Minard and Deepspeed Media recently created Archive, a short documentary exploring how they’re slowly but steadily achieving this ambitious goal.

Internet Archive from Deepspeed media on Vimeo. . .   Read More

Earth Engine: decades of Landsat photographs, animated

by Austin Brown on May 10th, 02013

Humans have been telling stories about space for generations, but now space is starting to tell stories about us. By putting satellites into orbit pointed not out at the stars, but in at our selves, and simply letting the cameras roll, we can see ourselves in aggregate, growing and changing. NASA’s Landsat program has. . .   Read More