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Blog Archive for the year 02006

Publish And Perish

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on December 1st, 02006

A piece in Forbes Magazine Publish And Perish Elisabeth Eaves, 12.01.06, 12:00 PM ET Nothing is safe. Not your e-mails, digital photos or Word files. Not old newspapers or books. When it comes to storing information, everything will disappear into digital obsolescence or crumble to dust. Even White House e-mails, important blueprints and influential works…  Read More

Phillip Rosedale – ‘Second Life:’ What Do We Learn If We Digitize EVERYTHING?

by Simone Davalos on November 30th, 02006

2nd Life takes off What is real life coming to owe digital life? After a couple years in the flat part of exponential growth, the steep part is now arriving for the massive multi-player online world construction kit called “Second Life.” With 1.7 million accounts, membership in “Second Life” is growing by 20,000 per day….  Read More

The Digital Ice Age

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on November 20th, 02006

  A good article on the digital preservation problem in Popular Mechanics: http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/industry/4201645.html?page=1 When the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz takes to sea, it carries more than a half-million files with diagrams of the propulsion, electrical and other systems critical to operation. Because this is the 21st century, these are not unwieldy paper scrolls of engineering…  Read More

Katherine Fulton – “The Deeper News About the New Philanthropy”

by Simone Davalos on November 3rd, 02006

Philanthropic stamina 10,000 families in the US, Katherine Fulton reported, have assets of $100 million or more. That’s up from 7,000 just a couple years ago. Most of that money is “on the sidelines.” The poor and the middle class are far more generous in their philanthropy, proportionally, than the very wealthy. Philanthropy across the…  Read More

John Baez – Zooming Out In Time

by Simone Davalos on October 16th, 02006

Welcome to the Anthropocene The graphs we see these days, John Baez began, all look vertical— carbon burning shooting up, CO2 in the air shooting up, global temperature shooting up, and population still shooting up. How can we understand what really going on? “It’s like trying to understand geology while you’re hanging by your fingernails…  Read More

Orville Schell – “China Thinks Long-term, But Can It Relearn to Act Long-term?”

by Simone Davalos on October 4th, 02006

Giant contradictions “China is the most unresolved nation of consequence in the world,” Orville Schell began. It is defined by its massive contradictions. And by its massiveness— China’s population is estimated to be 1.25 to 1.3 billion; the margin of error in the estimate is greater than the population of France. It has 160 cities…  Read More

Modern History Gap

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 13th, 02006

Storing information is easier than ever, but it’s also never been so easy to lose it — forever. We could end up with a modern history gap. By Charles Piller, LA Times Staff Writer September 13, 2006 Carter G. Walker remembers the day her memories vanished. After sending an e-mail to her aunt, the Montana…  Read More

‘One small step for man,’ 700-box tape loss for NASA

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on August 16th, 02006

Original recordings of Apollo moon missions are missing WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The U.S. government has misplaced the original recording of the first moon landing, including astronaut Neil Armstrong’s famous “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” a NASA spokesman said on Monday. Armstrong’s famous space walk, seen by millions of viewers on…  Read More

John Rendon – “Long-term Policy to Make the War on Terror Short”

by Stewart Brand on July 17th, 02006

Only connect John Rendon, head of The Rendon Group, is a senior communications consultant to the White Houses and Departments of Defense. His subject in this talk is how to replace tactical, reactive response to terror with long-term strategic initative. I think that people were expecting a silver-tongued devil, an accomplished spin-meister, arrogant but charming,…  Read More

Will Wright and Brian Eno – “Playing with Time”

by Simone Davalos on June 26th, 02006

Generative play In a dazzling duet Will Wright and Brian Eno gave an intense clinic on the joys and techniques of “generative” creation. Back in the 1970s both speakers got hooked by cellular automata such as Conway’s “Game of Life,” where just a few simple rules could unleash profoundly unpredictable and infinitely varied dynamic patterns….  Read More