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Blog Archive for the ‘Clock of the Long Now’ Category

Clock of the Long Now – Installation Begins

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 20th, 02018

  “The Long Now is the recognition that the precise moment you’re in grows out of the past and is a seed for the future.”                   – Brian Eno (founding board member of The Long Now Foundation) After over a decade of design and fabrication, we have…  Read More

Danny Hillis publishes new essay on Long-Term Timekeeping in the Clock of the Long Now

by Ahmed Kabil on November 7th, 02017

Danny Hillis, Long Now co-founder and designer of the 10,000 Year Clock, has a new essay, “Long-Term Timekeeping in the Clock of the Long Now” in the book The Science of Time 2016: Time in Astronomy & Society, Past, Present and Future (published November 02017). The Science of Time 2016 presents “information on the science and history of time and…  Read More

Interview: Alexander Rose and Phil Libin on Long-Term Thinking

by Ahmed Kabil on July 19th, 02017

Long Now Executive Director Alexander Rose and former Evernote CEO Phil Libin recently spoke with the design agency Dialogue about the layers of civilization, the future of products, and the Clock of the Long Now. The interview is wide-ranging, covering everything from the early tech, design and science fiction influences in Rose and Libin’s childhoods to…  Read More

The Orrery at The Interval: An Invitation to Long-Term Thinking

by Ahmed Kabil on April 24th, 02017

As visitors to Fort Mason amble past The Interval, the Long Now Foundation’s cafe-bar-museum-venue space, some are drawn, as if by gravitational pull, to an unusual eight foot-tall stainless steel technological curiosity they glimpse through the glass doors. Metal gears sit stacked one on top of the other to form a tower, with geneva wheels jutting…  Read More

These 1,000-Year-Old Windmills Work Perfectly, But Their Future is in Doubt

by Ahmed Kabil on April 10th, 02017

From National Geographic comes a video profiling the durable windmills of Nashtifan, Iran. These windmills constructed over a thousand years ago out of clay, straw and wood are not only still standing; they work just as well as they did when they were first built. In designing and building the Clock of the Long Now, we…  Read More

The 10,000-Year Geneaology of Myths

by Ahmed Kabil on February 8th, 02017

ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS SCENES in the Paleolithic cave paintings in Lascaux, France depicts a confrontation between a man and a bison. The bison appears fixed in place, stabbed by a spear. The man has a bird’s head and is lying prone on the ground. Scholars have long puzzled over the pictograph’s meaning, as…  Read More

The Future Will Have to Wait

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 6th, 02017

Eleven years ago this month, Pulitzer Prize winning author Michael Chabon published an article in Details Magazine about Long Now and the Clock.  It continues to be one of the best and most poignant pieces written to date… The Future Will Have to Wait Written by Michael Chabon for Details in January of 02006 I was reading, in…  Read More

Long Now’s First Ever Member Summit: October 4, 02016

by Mikl Em on September 23rd, 02016

Our first ever global gathering is less than two weeks away! Join us in San Francisco on October 4th, 02016. In 01996: The Long Now Foundation was established to foster long-term thinking and responsibility in the framework of the next 10,000 years. In 02007: The Long Now Foundation’s Membership program was launched. The list of…  Read More

Why build a 10,000 Year Clock?

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on November 20th, 02015

Adam Weber and Jimmy Goldblum of Public Record released this short video about The Clock of The Long Now this week at the New York Documentary Film Festival and it can also be seen at The Atlantic.

Clock of the Long Now on Display at Deutsches Museum in Munich

by Charlotte Hajer on September 15th, 02015

For the next twelve months, the first prototype of the Clock of the Long Now will be on display at the Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany. It forms part of their Welcome to the Anthropocene exhibit – an interactive and multidisciplinary museum experience meant to prompt reflection and discussion about the notion of a ‘human…  Read More

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