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Blog Archive for the ‘Millennial Precedent’ Category

Proximity to Resources Helps Explain Locations of Easter Island Monuments, a New Paper Argues

by Ahmed Kabil on February 14th, 02019

A new paper by archaeologists Terry Hunt and Carl Lipo addresses one of the longstanding mysteries of the monuments of Easter Island: their location.

Four hundred of the statues, known as muai, are located miles away from where they were originally quarried, and sit on megalithic platforms, or ahu. An analysis of the locations of. . .   Read More

The 26,000-Year Astronomical Monument Hidden in Plain Sight

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 29th, 02019

On the western flank of the Hoover Dam stands a little-understood monument, commissioned by the US Bureau of Reclamation when construction of the dam began in 01931. The most noticeable parts of this corner of the dam, now known as Monument Plaza, are the massive winged bronze sculptures and central flagpole which are often. . .   Read More

These 1,000-Year-Old Windmills Work Perfectly, But Their Future is in Doubt

by Ahmed Kabil on April 10th, 02017

From National Geographic comes a video profiling the durable windmills of Nashtifan, Iran. These windmills constructed over a thousand years ago out of clay, straw and wood are not only still standing; they work just as well as they did when they were first built. In designing and building the Clock of the Long Now, we…  Read More

Craters & Mudrock: Tools for Imagining Distant Future Finlands

by Vincent Ialenti on July 5th, 02016

Lake Lappajärvi (Photo Credit: Hannu Oksa)About 73 million years ago a meteorite crashed into what is now Finland’s Southern Ostrobothnia region. Today, serene Lake Lappajärvi rests in the twenty-three kilometer wide crater made in the distant past blast’s wake. Locals still enjoy boating to Lappajärvi’s Kärnänsaari: an island formed by the Cretaceous meteorite collision’s melt-rock….  Read More

Member Discount for “Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art”

by Andrew Warner on October 23rd, 02015

Long Now is proud to be a co-partner with YBCA in showing “Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art”. The film will be shown at 7:30 PM on Thursday October 29 and 2:00 PM on Sunday November 1 at YBCA’s Screening Room. Troublemakers unearths the history of land art, featuring a cadre of renegades who sought…  Read More

2,000-Year Old Termite Mounds Found in Central Africa

by Charlotte Hajer on August 28th, 02015

Much like ants, termites are a testament to the adage that a whole is greater than the sum of its parts. A single termite is an almost translucent creature, no more than a few millimeters long. But put several thousand of them together, and they become capable of building expansive structures, some reaching up as…  Read More

No Apocalypse Necessary

by Austin Brown on October 14th, 02013

Writing for Aeon Magazine, Colin Dickey, visited the Svalbard Global Seed Vault and discusses the apocalyptic rhetoric often associated with the project. He points out that apocalyptic thinking, while sometimes an effective motivator, can be a barrier to long-term thinking. This obsession with impending disaster suggests that we see nature on a particularly human, individual…  Read More

Alexander Rose Visits Ise Shrine Reconstruction Ceremony

by Austin Brown on October 3rd, 02013

Long Now Executive Director Alexander Rose, also the Project Manager for the 10,000-Year Clock, collects inspiring examples (or in some cases, failures) of long-term thinking, architecture and design. In a talk called Millennial Precedent, he discussed some of these examples and the lessons he draws from them. Among them is a Japanese shrine in the…  Read More

The Apollo Goodwill Disc

by Alex Mensing on August 9th, 02012

On July 20, 01969, humans landed on the surface of the moon for the first time. But since only two of us got to go, NASA sent a message “FROM PLANET EARTH” in the rest of humanity’s stead. The message wasn’t a letter written in ink and paper, though. It was a thin silicon disc,…  Read More

Ancient Legend Saves Lives of Descendants

by Charlotte Hajer on April 11th, 02012

Sometimes technology fails – but luckily, collective memory can step in to lend a hand. In a recent LA Times article, José Holguín-Veras writes about an old legend that saved a small island community in Japan from perishing in the tsunami that followed the earthquake of March 02011. The quake had toppled their tsunami warning…  Read More