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Blog Archive for the ‘Rosetta’ Category

Rosetta and PanLex Projects at Exploratorium Market Days 10/19/13

by Austin Brown on October 17th, 02013

This Saturday October the 19th, Rosetta and PanLex Project staff will be at the Exploratorium’s final Market Days event of this year. The Exploratorium has been holding these free, outdoor events in the spirit of “exchanging fresh ideas on local phenomena.” Saturday’s theme is Heirlooms and Rosetta and PanLex will showcase our planet’s diverse linguistic stock. Come…  Read More

PanLex hits a billion translations

by Jonathan Pool on October 2nd, 02013

The PanLex project of The Long Now Foundation, which is building a database of words and phrases in the world’s languages, has recently passed the one-billion-translation mark. That means there are now over a billion pairs of words or phrases, such as “clock” in English and “ঘড়ী” in Assamese, that PanLex records as attested translations of each…  Read More

Forgotten Dictionaries of Indigenous Australian Languages Rediscovered

by Austin Brown on September 13th, 02013

Of the 145 indigenous languages spoken on the Australian continent, 110 are in danger of extinction, but a linguistics professor at the University of Sydney recently discovered a trove of documents that may help Australians better understand and preserve this diversity. It started with just a pair of small notebooks from the 19th century. Michael…  Read More

A New Dimension (or Two?) for Long-Term Data Storage

by Charlotte Hajer on July 26th, 02013

A group of scientists at the University of Southampton is pushing the frontier of long-term data storage technology to a new level. At a recent Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics in San José, the researchers announced their success at recording data in quartz glass by using a femtosecond laser. A femtosecond, or ultrafast, laser sends…  Read More

Memory of Mankind

by Austin Brown on May 29th, 02013

Among the photos on your walls, the art you’ve created, the things you’ve written or read – is there something you’d like to preserve for history? Something that you think deserves to be beheld by future generations, either for their edification or amusement? An Austrian project is offering a means to accomplish this by way…  Read More

Almost half of the world’s languages are endangered

by Austin Brown on April 17th, 02013

On the blog of Long Now’s Rosetta Project, intern Karin Wiecha describes the recently published findings of a major linguistics research effort: ELCat uses the metaphor of biodiversity to illustrate the gravity of the loss of an entire language family: If we compare the extinction of a language to the extinction of an animal species, the…  Read More

Encapsulated Universes

by Charlotte Hajer on February 28th, 02013

In a recent conversation with Edge, Stanford Psychologist and former SALT speaker Lera Boroditsky explores intriguing – and still controversial – questions about the relationship between the language we speak, and the way we think about the world. Weaving her thoughts together with examples from a variety of different languages, Boroditsky shows us that languages…  Read More

Happy International Mother Language Day 02013!

by Austin Brown on February 21st, 02013

On The Rosetta Project Blog, intern Karin Wiecha writes: Today mother tongues will be celebrated world wide. This date was chosen by UNESCO in recognition of the Bengali language movement, where on February 21, 01952, students protested for their language to become an official national language. Several protesters taking part in the demonstration were killed by police….  Read More

Decoding Long-Term Data Storage

by Charlotte Hajer on October 12th, 02012

If human societies are founded on the accumulation of knowledge through the ages, then the long-term transmission of information must be the cornerstone of a durable civilization. And as we accelerate ever more rapidly in our expansion of knowledge and technological capability, the development of durable storage methods becomes ever more important. In the process…  Read More

Storing Digital Data in DNA

by Laura Welcher on August 16th, 02012

Reported in Science today, scientists George Church, Yuan Gao and Sriram Kosuri report that they have written a 5.27-megabit “book” in DNA – encoding far more digital data in DNA than has ever been achieved. Writing messages in DNA was first demonstrated in 1988, and the largest amount of data written in DNA previously was…  Read More