Blog Archive for the ‘Seminars’ Category

navigateleft Older Articles   

Mariana Mazzucato Seminar Media

Posted on Wednesday, April 16th, 02014 by Andrew Warner
link   Categories: Announcements, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Private vs. Public Sector Myths

Monday March 24, 02014 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Mazzucato Seminar page for Members.

*********************

Audio is up on the Mazzucato Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.

*********************

Government as radical, patient VC – a summary by Stewart Brand

The iPhone, Mazzucato pointed out, is held up as a classic example of world-changing innovation coming from business.

Yet every feature of the iPhone was created, originally, by multi-decade government-funded research. From DARPA came the microchip, the Internet, the micro hard drive, the DRAM cache, and Siri. From the Department of Defense came GPS, cellular technology, signal compression, and parts of the liquid crystal display and multi-touch screen (joining funding from the CIA, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy, which, by the way, developed the lithium-ion battery.) CERN in Europe created the Web. Steve Jobs’ contribution was to integrate all of them beautifully.

Venture Capitalists (VCs) in business expect a return in 3 to 5 years, and they count on no more than one in ten companies to succeed. The time frame for government research and investment embraces a whole innovation cycle of 15 to 20 years, supporting the full chain from basic research through to viable companies. That means they can develop entire new fields such as space technology, aviation technology, nanotechnology, and, hopefully, Green technology.

But compare the reward structure. Government takes the greater risk with no prospect of great reward, while VCs and businesses take less risk and can reap enormous rewards. “We socialize the risks and privatize the rewards.” Mazzucato proposes mechanisms for the eventual rewards of deep innovation to cycle back into a government “innovation fund”—perhaps by owning equity in the advantaged companies, or retaining a controlling “golden share” of intellectual property rights, or through income-contingent loans (such as are made to students). “After Google made billions in profits, shouldn’t a small percentage have gone back to fund the public agency (National Science Foundation) that funded its algorithm?” In Brazil, China, and Germany, state development banks get direct returns from their investments.

The standard narrative about government in the US is that it stifles innovation, whereas the truth is that it enables innovation at a depth that business cannot reach, and the entire society, including business, gains as a result. “We have to change the way we think about the state,” Mazzucato concludes.

Subscribe to our Seminar email list for updates and summaries.

Tony Hsieh Seminar Primer

Posted on Tuesday, April 8th, 02014 by Charlotte Hajer
link   Categories: Seminars   chat 0 Comments

Tony Hsieh is perhaps best known as a successful Silicon Valley entrepreneur. He founded and then sold LinkExchange in the late 01990s, before going on to become CEO of online retail giant Zappos. But what Hsieh really does is build communities. Corporate tech is, for him, primarily a way to bring people together and foster a culture of togetherness. Any business, Hsieh is known to argue, should be evaluated not (just) on its return on investment, but on its ROC – its return on community.

Growing up in the Bay Area, Hsieh revealed an entrepreneurial spirit at an early age. In elementary and high school, he experimented with a variety of money-making ventures – from failed attempts to start a profitable worm farm to a successful mail-order button-making business – and as a Harvard undergrad, he managed an on-campus pizzeria. After graduating with a degree in computer science, the founding of LinkExchange was a logical next step. The company, an online advertising cooperative, became wildly successful: two years after its launch, it sold to Microsoft for several hundreds of millions of dollars. Hsieh, however, hadn’t much cared for the corporate lifestyle and profits-oriented culture at LinkExchange. So when he became involved with Zappos – first as an early investor, soon after as CEO – he set out to do things differently.

imgres-1Hsieh puts a lot of heart and effort into the creation of a positive corporate culture. Not only is “service” the number one commandment in Zappos’ oft-cited code of conduct; other items encourage “open and honest relationships,” “family spirit,” and even “fun and a little weirdness.” The company’s quarterly all-hands meetings are reported to be celebratory events full of music performances, employee skits, and bold stunts. Instead of traditional job titles, what you’ll find at Zappos are ‘ninjas’ and ‘monkeys’. In fact, the company recently announced that it is doing away with traditional corporate hierarchy altogether: it’s transitioning into a holacracy, an organizational structure based on principles of self-governance and a democratic distribution of power.

Fortune Magazine consistently ranks Zappos among the nation’s best companies to work for, and Hsieh is eager to share the positivity. In 02010, he published Delivering Happiness, an autobiography-cum-manifesto in which he shows that a focus on company culture and community wellbeing can actually lead to greater profits. The book became so popular that Hsieh and his team soon launched a company and website dedicated entirely to spreading its message.

These days, Hsieh spends much of his time pursuing his mission of community happiness in a very particular location. In downtown Las Vegas, a neighborhood of struggling casinos and weekly hotels long forgotten in the dark shadow of the glittery Strip, he’s been working on a major urban revitalization project.

The Downtown Project was born in 02011, when it became clear that Zappos was growing out of its headquarters in Henderson, Nevada, and Hsieh began to think about building a new campus for his employees. He liked the sense of community created by companies like Nike, Apple, and Facebook, but wanted to avoid the insularity that often characterized their Silicon Valley compounds. As Hsieh explains,

We started brainstorming, what’s the dream campus we can create? And we decided, rather than take this very insular approach to building a campus, let’s actually take more of an NYU-type approach, where the campus kind of blends in with the city, and so rather than focus just on Zappos, focus on the community, and then over time that’ll become this kind of self-feeding thing that will ultimately help retain and attract more employees and be good for the city as well. It’s slightly different from most development projects, in that we’re not trying to master plan from the top down, we really want it to be organic and driven by the community, and part of the goal is for us at Zappos to learn from cities how to be more innovative and scale our culture, and scale our productivity. Once you have that, then the magic just kind of happens automatically.

800px-Fremont_East_view_from_ElCortezKey in Hsieh’s vision is the notion of collisions: the idea that innovation and creativity sprout from random, unplanned, and informal encounters between people. Hsieh ultimately tries to  build companies – and now, whole communities – that are designed to maximize those collisions.

“It’s the Downtown Project’s big bet,” Hsieh says [in Wired Magazine], “that a focus on collisions, com­munity, and colearning will lead to happiness, luckiness, innovation, and pro­ductivity. It’s not even so big a bet,” he adds. “Research has been done about this on the office level. It’s just never really been applied in a consolidated way to a city revitalization project.”

Big or not, it’s a bet with $350 million riding on it. Hsieh has invested $200 million in local real estate, and $50 million each in education, small businesses, and a tech start-up fund. He’s building schools, developing parks, establishing community work spaces, and organizing arts and music festivals. Inspired by Edward Glaeser’s theories of urban vitality, Hsieh envisions the city as a kind of incubator: by bringing in promising new business and creating spaces for its entrepreneurs to ‘collide’ with one another, he hopes to spur new life and creativity. For Hsieh, innovation and community go hand in hand.

In the end, Hsieh hopes his efforts will pay off in many ways. Beyond setting up shop in Las Vegas, which offered Zappos a more favorable tax treatment, he expects that by making the city more livable it will be good for business and help him attract and retain top-tier talent.

Tony Hsieh will talk about his Downtown Project and the importance of community vitality at the SF JAZZ Center on April 22. You can reserve tickets, get directions, and sign up for the podcast on our Seminars page.

George Dyson: No Time Is There – A Seminar Flashback

Posted on Friday, April 4th, 02014 by Mikl Em
link   Categories: Seminars, Technology   chat 0 Comments

In March 02013 George Dyson spoke for Long Now about the origins of the digital universe. Dyson, an author and science historian, gave a detailed explication of the dawn of the modern computer in the 1950s at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study (IAS). Twice a month we highlight a Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT) from our archives.

SALT audio is free for everyone on our Seminar pages and via podcast. Long Now members can see all Seminar videos in HD. Video of the 12 most recent Seminars is also free for all to view.

No Time Is There: The Digital Universe and Why Things Appear To Be Speeding Up is a recent SALT talk (for a little longer). It will be free for public viewing until late April 02014.

Legends of science and mathematics like Alan Turing, Kurt Gödel, and John von Neumann feature prominently in these stories. Dyson’s remarkable historical reporting also includes first-hand observances of von Neumann’s workspace and insights gleaned from his interviews with participants at these events. His father, the theoretical physicist Freeman Dyson, went to work at IAS in 1953–the same year George was born.

Much of the early digital work was closely intertwined with the post-WWII effort to engineer better bombs.

From Stewart Brand’s summary of this Seminar (in full here):

In the few years they ran that machine, from 1951 to 1957, they worked on the most difficult problems of their time, five main problems that are on very different time scales—26 orders of magnitude in time—from the lifetime of a neutron in a bomb’s chain reaction measured in billionths of a second, to the behavior of shock waves on the scale of seconds, to weather prediction on a scale of days, to biological evolution on the scale of centuries, to the evolution of stars and galaxies over billions of years. And our lives, measured in days and years, is right in the middle of the scale of time. I still haven’t figured that out.

George Dyson, 02013 March Seminar: No Time is There

George Dyson is an author and science historian whose books include Baidarka the Kayak, Darwin Among the Machinesand Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe. This was the third time he spoke on the Long Now Seminar stage, including the 02005 SALT Talk presented with his sister Esther and their father Freeman Dyson.

Here’s a short video excerpt of this talk:

The Seminars About Long-term Thinking series began in 02003 and is presented each month live in San Francisco. The series is curated and hosted by Long Now’s President Stewart Brand. Seminar audio is available to all via podcast.

Everyone can watch full video of the last 12 Long Now Seminars. That includes this Seminar video until late April 02014. Long Now members can watch the full ten years of Seminars in HD. Membership levels start at $8/month and include lots of benefits. You can join Long Now here.

Tony Hsieh Seminar Tickets

Posted on Thursday, March 27th, 02014 by Andrew Warner
link   Categories: Announcements, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

 

The Long Now Foundation’s monthly

Seminars About Long-term Thinking

Tony Hsieh presents Helping Revitalize a City

Tony Hsieh presents “Helping Revitalize a City”

TICKETS

Tuesday April 22, 02014 at 7:30pm SFJAZZ Center

Long Now Members can reserve 2 seats, join today! General Tickets $15

 

About this Seminar:

Can a successful company and a run-down downtown vitalize each other?

Tony Hsieh, CEO of the phenomenally successful Zappos, is betting exactly that in Las Vegas.  He moved his company headquarters into the former city hall and is integrating the Zappos campus into the surrounding neighborhood, meanwhile investing millions to provide a dense urban experience for the locals as well as his employees.  His “Downtown Project” declares: “We’ve allocated $350 million to aid in the revitalization of Downtown Las Vegas. We’re investing $200 million in real estate, $50 million in small businesses, $50 million in education, and $50 million in tech startups.”

The fantasy is well along into impressive reality, according to a January 2014 article in Wired.  What is being learned may change how cities and companies think of themselves—and of each other.

Hsieh’s theory of urban vitality comes from Edward Glaeser’s book The Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier.  His theory of company vitality he has spelled out in his own book, Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose.

Edward Burtynsky: The 10,000-year Gallery – A Seminar Flashback

Posted on Wednesday, March 19th, 02014 by Mikl Em
link   Categories: Clock of the Long Now, Long Term Art, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

In October 02008 Edward Burtynsky spoke for Long Now on The 10,000-year Gallery. Burtynsky, an internationally-recognized photographer, presented his ideas for a gallery of images to accompany the Clock of the Long Now.

Twice a month we highlight a Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT) from our archives. Long Now members can watch this Seminar video here, and this talk is even better with the visuals.

SALT audio is free for everyone on our Seminar pages and via podcast. Long Now members can see all Seminar videos in HD. Video of the 12 most recent Seminars is also free for all to view.

Burtynsky’s The 10,000-year Gallery talk includes a formal proposal for a permanent art gallery in the chamber that encloses the 10,000-year Clock as well as the results of his research into methods of capturing images that might have the best chance to survive in the long-term.

Photographer Edward Burtynsky

From Stewart Brand’s summary of this Seminar (in full here):

On the stage Burtynsky showed a large carbon transfer print of one of his ultra-high resolution photographs. The color and detail were perfect. Accelerated studies show that the print could hang in someone’s living room for 500 years and show no loss of quality. Kept in the Clock’s mountain in archival conditions it would remain unchanged for 10,000 years. He said that making one print takes five days of work, costs $2,000, and only ten artisans in the world have the skill, at locations in Toronto, Seattle, and Cornwall.

Edward Burtynsky‘s photographs are collected in museums all over the world. He is known for his large-format photographs of industrial landscapes which include mining locations around the globe and the building of Three Gorges Dam in China. His work has been noted for beautiful images which are often at odds with their subject’s negative environmental impacts. In recent years his work has focused on water including oil spills around the world.

The Seminars About Long-term Thinking series began in 02003 and is presented each month live in San Francisco. The series is curated and hosted by Long Now’s President Stewart Brand. Seminar audio is available to all via podcast.

Long Now members can watch the full video of this Seminar here—you must be logged in to the site. Membership levels start at $8/month and include lots of benefits. Join Long Now today.

Mariana Mazzucato Seminar Primer

Posted on Monday, March 10th, 02014 by Andrew Warner
link   Categories: Announcements, Long Term Science, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

20130831_WBD000_0

Since the Enlightenment and its corresponding assumptions of social-technological progress, scholars have debated what political and economic systems best facilitate technological growth.
These days, one of the common assumptions of the technology sector is that the government is fundamentally a limiting force when it comes to innovation. This view is a well-established conservative position since the advent of the Chicago School of Keynesian Economics, but even among progressives, there’s a strong sentiment that the government doesn’t have what it takes to innovate and bring new technologies to the helm. Headlines seem to support this theory: it takes the private sector a fraction of the cost to send rockets to space, new laws banning disruptive technology companies like AirBnb and Uber seem to crop up every week. A cursory glance at this issue would seem to suggest that when it comes to developing new technologies, Thomas Jefferson’s maxim still rings loud and true: That government which governs best, governs least.

5579b77b74fa8628aaa2b0fb97317742e3d7b6c1_254x191Enter Mariana Mazzucato. Currently the RM Phillips chair in the Economics of Innovation at the University of Sussex, she also has a long resume of academic positions at other prestigious universities, including University of Denver, London Business School, Open University, and Bocconi University. Her research focuses on the role of the State in modern capitalism, and her analysis runs counter to the tech communities’ common understanding of how technologies come to market. Mariana Mazzucato’s research shows that many of the technologies that form the backbone of our technological revolutions were the direct result of multi-decade research by the state. Consider the examples of computers, the internet, and GPS–all of these technologies were developed and funded by the government for decades before entering the consumer market, and it’s impossible to imagine an iphone without these technologies.

In his 02011 SALT talk, Geoffrey West noted that the average lifespan of a company is merely 10 years. On such short time scales, it’s hard for companies to invest in technologies that don’t have immediate market potential. It’s not a coincidence that Apple or Google came to fruition under the auspices of a government that heavily invested in these technologies: the computer manufacturer was able to build its first machine by virtue of a $500,000 investment from an obscure government entity, and the search engine’s revolutionary algorithm was developed through research that was funded by the National Science Foundation. When one then considers the network of publicly-funded universities and labs (which developed technologies such as HTML and touchscreens), the mythos of the lone entrepreneur/inventor starts to look incomplete at best.

Mazzucato’s analysis forces us to ponder a rather uncomfortable question: Why do we systematically downplay these long-term investments by the government, and champion the companies that bring these mature technologies to market?

To learn more about the economics of innovation, come see Mariana Mazzucato on March 24th at the SFJAZZ Center in San Francisco. You can reserve tickets, get directions and sign up for the podcast on the Seminar page.

Subscribe to the Seminars About Long-term Thinking podcast for more thought-provoking programs.

Lera Boroditsky: How Language Shapes Thought – A Seminar Flashback

Posted on Wednesday, March 5th, 02014 by Mikl Em
link   Categories: Rosetta, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

In October 02010 Lera Boroditsky spoke for Long Now on How Language Shapes Thought in a talk that resonates with the Rosetta Project, Long Now’s language preservation project.

SALT audio is free for everyone on our Seminar pages and via podcast. Long Now members can see all Seminar videos in HD. Video of the 12 most recent Seminars is also free for all to view.

Twice a month we highlight a Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT) from our archives. Members can watch this Seminar video here, and this talk in particular is even better with the visuals.

Lera Boroditsky is a cognitive scientist at UC San Diego (and was previously at MIT and Stanford). She has been named one of 25 Visionaries changing the world by the Utne Reader; other honors include being named a Searle Scholar, a McDonnell scholar, and an NSF Career award. She is Editor in Chief of Frontiers in Cultural Psychology.

In How Language Shapes Thought Boroditsky presents fascinating insights into the relationship between languages and thought. Drawing directly from her own work and other contemporary research, the questions she addresses include: whether those who speak different languages think differently? Does learning a new language shape the way you think? Do multilingual individuals think differently when speaking different languages? Are some thoughts unthinkable without language?

From Stewart Brand’s summary of the talk (in full here):

Lera Boroditsky speaks for Long Now

Time is the most common noun in the English language said Boroditsky. (Followed by person, year, way, and day.) Time is often expressed as travel in space: “We’re coming up on Christmas.” But some languages put the future in front of us, and others put it behind us. For Aborigines that Boroditsky studied in north Australia, time and sequence gets blended into their profound orientation to the cardinal directions. They don’t use relative terms like “left” and “right,” but absolute compass terms (There’s an ant on your southwest leg), and they have extraordinary orientation skills.

She cites a wide range of languages and research from around the world in a scientific tour through cultures and cognition that includes a few experiments with the audience at the Seminar. This is a fun and accessible talk filled with 02000′s pop cultural references like Dick Cheney’s quail hunting mishap and “Freedom Fries”–Boroditsky even has some helpful tips on how to better annoy the French.

The Seminars About Long-term Thinking series began in 02003 and is presented each month live in San Francisco. The series is curated and hosted by Long Now’s President Stewart Brand. Seminar audio is available to all via podcast.

Long Now members can watch the full video of this Seminar here—you must be logged in to the site. Membership levels start at $8/month and include lots of benefits. Join Long Now today.

Mariana Mazzucato Seminar Tickets

Posted on Monday, March 3rd, 02014 by Andrew Warner
link   Categories: Announcements, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

 

The Long Now Foundation’s monthly

Seminars About Long-term Thinking

Mariana Mazzucato presents The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Private vs. Public Sector Myths

Mariana Mazzucato presents

“The Entrepreneurial State:

Debunking Private vs. Public Sector Myths”

TICKETS

Monday March 24, 02014 at 7:30pm SFJAZZ Center

Long Now Members can reserve 2 seats, join today! General Tickets $15

 

About this Seminar:

Where do the boldest innovations, with the deepest consequences for society, come from?

Business leaders, entrepreneurs, and libertarians claim that the private sector leads the way always, and government at best follows by decades and at worst impedes the process with bureaucratic regulations.

Mariana Mazzucato proves otherwise. Many of the most profound innovations—from the Internet and GPS to nanotech and biotech —had their origin in government programs developed specifically to explore innovations that might eventually attract private sector interest. Governments can take on multi-decade, slow-payoff, ambitious projects where most businesses cannot. The process works pretty well now. How can it work better?

Mazzucato is a professor of the Economics of Innovation at Sussex University and author of The Entrepreneurial State: debunking private vs. public sector myths.

Colonel Matthew Bogdanos Seminar Media

Posted on Thursday, February 27th, 02014 by Andrew Warner
link   Categories: Announcements, Seminars   chat 0 Comments

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

The Unlooting of Civilization’s Treasures in Wartime Iraq

Monday February 24, 02014 – San Francisco

Because the talk revolves around and discusses the specifics of what is still an on-going investigation, there will not be any recording of any kind–audio or visual, of this Seminar. Thank you for your understanding.

*********************

Unlooting the Iraq Museum – a summary by Stewart Brand

Iraq’s National Museum in Baghdad had been closed to the public by Saddam Hussein for over two decades when his regime fell in April 02003. Iraqis felt no connection to the world renowned cultural treasures inside. Like every other government building, it was trashed and looted.

Marine Col. Matthew Bogdanos, then in Basra leading a counter-terrorism group, volunteered part of his team to attempt recovery of the lost artifacts. He arrived at the museum with 14 people to protect its dozen buildings and 11 acres in a still-active battle zone. Invited by the museum director, they took up residence and analyzed the place as a crime scene.

Missing were some of civilization’s most historic archeological treasures. From 3200 BC, the Sacred Vase of Warka, the world’s oldest carved stone ritual vessel. From 2600 BC, the solid gold bull’s head from the Golden Harp of Ur. From 2250 BC, the copper Akkadian Bassetki Statue, the earliest known example of lost-wax casting. From 3100 BC, the limestone Mask of Warka, the first naturalistic depiction of a human face. From 800 BC, the Treasure of Nimrud— a fabulous hoard of hundreds of pieces of exquisite Assyrian gold jewelry and gems. Plus thousands of other artifacts and antiquities, including Uruk inscribed cylinder seals from 2500 BC.

Bidding on the international antiquities black market went to $25,000 for Uruk cylinder seals, $40 million for the Vase of Warka.

Since the goal was recovery, not prosecution, Bogdanos instituted a total amnesty for return of stolen artifacts—no questions asked, and also no payment, just a cordial cup of tea for thanks. Having learned from duty in Afghanistan to listen closely to the locals, Bogdanos and his team walked the streets, visited the mosques, played backgammon in the neighborhoods, and followed up on friendly tips (every one of which turned out to be genuine). 3,000 items had been taken from the museum by random looters. Local Iraqis returned 95% of them.

The prime pieces stolen by professional thieves took longer to track down. Raids on smuggler’s trucks and hiding places turned up more items. The Bassetki Statue was found hidden in a cesspool; the Mask of Warka had been buried in the ground. Some pieces began turning up all over the world and were seized when identified. (Bogdanos noted that Geneva, Switzerland, is where that kind of contraband often rests in warehouses that law enforcement is not allowed to search.)

It turned out Saddam himself had looted the museum of the Treasure of Nimrud and the gold bull’s head back in 01990. Tips led to a flooded underground vault in the bombed-out Central Bank of Iraq, and the priceless items were discovered.

Everything found was returned to the Iraq National Museum, where the great antiquities are gradually being restored to public display. Iraq, and the world, is retaking possession of its most ancient heritage.

Bogdanos quoted Sophocles: “Whoever neglects the arts… has lost the past and is dead to the future.”

(This talk was neither recorded nor filmed, because material presented in it is part of a still on-going investigation. You can get the full story from Bogdanos’ excellent book, Thieves of Baghdad.)

Subscribe to our Seminar email list for updates and summaries.

Chris Anderson: The Makers Revolution – A Seminar Flashback

Posted on Thursday, February 20th, 02014 by Mikl Em
link   Categories: Seminars   chat 0 Comments

This is the debut of a new feature on our blog. A couple times a month we’ll highlight a past Long Now Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT). We’ll start with a talk from a year ago. Author and technologist Chris Anderson spoke about The Makers Revolution in February 02013.

Audio of our SALT series is always available free for everyone on our Seminar pages and via podcast. We host full video of the 12 most recent Seminars free for everyone, too. Long Now members can see all our Seminar videos in HD.

The Makers Revolution is a recent SALT talk. It will be free for public viewing until late March 02014.

Chris Anderson has been a journalist, author, and entrepeneur. He was the Editor in Chief of Wired Magazine, wrote for The Economist for seven years, and his books include The Long Tail, Free, and Makers: The New Industrial Revolution. He is the CEO of 3D Robotics and founder of DIY Drones.

In his Long Now talk The Makers Revolution Anderson takes us step-by-step from the 19th century Industrial Revolution to present day. Desktop publishing, PostScript, factory automation, supply chain innovation, globalization, 3D Printing, Cloud Manufacturing, and the failings of the doll house furniture industry all feature along the way. He relates his own generational maker journey: as a child learning invention & making from his father and grandfather to now manufacturing at home with his kids.

From Stewart Brand’s summary of this Seminar (in full here):

Since 02006, Maker Faires, Hackerspaces, and TechShops (equipped with laser cutters, 3D printers, and CAD design software) have proliferated in the US and around the world. Anderson said he got chills when, with the free CAD program Autodesk 123D, he finished designing an object and moused up to click the button that used to say “Print.” This one said “Make.” A 3D printer commenced building his design.

Here’s a short video clip from the Seminar:

The Seminars About Long-term Thinking series began in 02003 and is presented each month live in San Francisco. The series is curated and hosted by Long Now’s President Stewart Brand. Seminar audio is available to all via podcast.

Watch full video of this SALT talk until late March 02014. See full video of the 12 most recent Seminars on our website. Only Long Now members can access ten years of Seminars in HD. Membership starts at $8/month and includes lots of benefits. Join Long Now today.