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Blog Archive for the year 02019

New Interview with Long Now Co-Founder Danny Hillis about 10,000 Year Clock

by Ahmed Kabil on May 21st, 02019

Long Now co-founder Danny Hillis was recently interviewed by e-flux for its Digital X collaboration with the Norman Foster Foundation. He spoke about his inspiration and process for building the 10,000 Year Clock, as well as the value of long-term thinking.

The value of the clock is mostly in thinking about. . .   Read More

A History of Land Art in the American West, Part III

by Ahmed Kabil on May 21st, 02019

As installation begins at the Texas site for Long Now’s monumental 10,000 Year Clock, it’s worth taking a step back to examine the Clock’s larger artistic context and its place in the history of Land Art in the American West.

Long Now’s staff. . .   Read More

Interval Highlight: Stewart Brand on Reviving the Mammoth Steppe

by Ahmed Kabil on May 20th, 02019

Stewart Brand explains the theory behind the Pleistocene Park project, which for the last 3 decades has been placing grazing animals on Siberia’s tundra to recreate the mammoth steppe habitat of the Pleistocene epoch.

From the Conversation at The Interval, “Siberia: A Journey to the Mammoth Steppe. . .   Read More

Seminar Highlight: Ian McEwan on How Humans Will Come To Trust A.I

by Ahmed Kabil on May 16th, 02019

Taking a question from the audience, author Ian McEwan says that we’ll know we’ve achieved complete trust with lifelike machines once we stop asking them, “Are you real?”

From the Long Now Seminar, “Machines Like Me” by Ian McEwan. . .   Read More

What Trees Tell Us

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02019

The rings of centuries-old trees are offering scientists a more complete picture of climate change and the role of humans in causing it. . .   Read More

Former Seminar Speaker Stephen Pyne Interviewed in Piece About California Wildfires

by Ahmed Kabil on May 15th, 02019

Former Seminar speaker Stephen Pyne was recently interviewed for a piece in New York Magazine about what it means to build permanent structures in California—a state that was always meant to continually burn and shake. 

So quickly, according to the fire historian Stephen Pyne, we forget the threat is even real. “We think. . .   Read More

Translating the Big Bang into Blackfoot

by Ahmed Kabil on May 13th, 02019

Meet Corey Gray and Sharon Yellowfly, a mother-son duo translating astrophysics into the Native American language Siksika (Blackfoot).

On April 1, scientists will officially restart their search for gravitational waves after a year spent making improvements to massive twin detectors. Discoveries should soon start rolling in, and when they do, there’s. . .   Read More

Laura Welcher speaks at Rhizome 7 x 7

by Ahmed Kabil on May 10th, 02019

Last month, Long Now’s Laura Welcher was part of the group of artists and technologists that were invited to Rhizome’s Seven on Seven conference in New York City. Welcher and artist Hayal Pozanti presented their art project WantNot. From Art News:

“Fate brought us together,” Laura Welcher, the director of operations at the. . .   Read More

Ancient Native Legend About a Great Flood is True, Study Finds

by Ahmed Kabil on May 9th, 02019

Geologists have verified that the legend of a great flood passed down orally by the Pacific Northwest’s Klallam people for 2,700 years is not a myth, but a warning. A new study has found that as many as five tsunamis hit an ancient Klallam village in present-day Washington state.

The evidence comes. . .   Read More

Trevor Paglen’s Orbital Reflector Goes “Unrealized”

by Ahmed Kabil on May 8th, 02019

On December 3rd, 02018, Trevor Paglen’s Orbital Reflector launched into low orbit as part of the payload on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket. The 100-foot-long diamond shaped mylar balloon was intended to be the world’s first space sculpture. It would be visible to the naked eye, appearing as a slowly-moving. . .   Read More