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Author Archive

Racial Injustice & Long-term Thinking

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on June 8th, 02020

Long Now Community, Since 01996, Long Now has endeavored to foster long-term thinking in the world by sharing perspectives on our deep past and future. We have too often failed, however, to include and listen to Black perspectives. Racism is a long-term civilizational problem with deep roots in the past, profound effects . . .   Read More

Long-term Building in Japan

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 11th, 02019

When I started working with Stewart Brand over two decades ago, he told me about the ideas behind Long Now, and how we might build the seed for a very long-lived institution. . .   Read More

Long-Lived Institutions

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on June 27th, 02019

The Sagrada Familia Catholic Church in Barcelona, Spain. The Catholic Church is one of the longest-lived institutions in human history.

The Long Now Foundation was founded in 01996 with the idea to build a 10,000 year clock — an icon to long-term thinking that might inspire people to engage more deeply with. . .   Read More

The 26,000-Year Astronomical Monument Hidden in Plain Sight

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 29th, 02019

On the western flank of the Hoover Dam stands a little-understood monument, commissioned by the US Bureau of Reclamation when construction of the dam began in 01931. The most noticeable parts of this corner of the dam, now known as Monument Plaza, are the massive winged bronze sculptures and central flagpole which are often. . .   Read More

A Journey to Siberia in Search of Woolly Mammoths

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 27th, 02018

Harvard geneticist George Church, who is leading efforts to de-extinct the woolly mammoth, explores a cave in Siberia. Photo by Brendan Hall. There will be three long flights across 15 time zones before I sleep in a bed, and we still won’t be there. Our destination is vastly closer to where we start than the path […]

Clock of the Long Now – Installation Begins

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on February 20th, 02018

  “The Long Now is the recognition that the precise moment you’re in grows out of the past and is a seed for the future.”                   – Brian Eno (founding board member of The Long Now Foundation) After over a decade of design and fabrication, we have […]

George Dyson’s Selections for The Manual for Civilization

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on March 8th, 02017

Some time ago I stopped in to visit the author George Dyson at his shop and home north of Seattle to walk through his book collection and get his suggestions for our collection of books called the Manual for Civilization. We’ve done similar personal library tours with Kevin Kelly, Megan and Rick Prelinger, Neal Stephenson, […]

The Future Will Have to Wait

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on January 6th, 02017

Eleven years ago this month, Pulitzer Prize winning author Michael Chabon published an article in Details Magazine about Long Now and the Clock.  It continues to be one of the best and most poignant pieces written to date…

The Future Will Have to Wait
Written by Michael Chabon for Details in January of 02006

I. . .   Read More

Cocktail Mechanics class at The Interval

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on December 16th, 02015

  The Interval at Long Now cocktail classroom series: “Cocktail Mechanics” class at The Interval (tickets $100 each) Taught by Jennifer Colliau (Beverage Director of The Interval at Long Now) The Interval’s new cocktail classroom series will teach you the art and science of making drinks. In small, hands-on classes you will learn the fundamentals and finer points […]

Why build a 10,000 Year Clock?

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on November 20th, 02015

Adam Weber and Jimmy Goldblum of Public Record released this short video about The Clock of The Long Now this week at the New York Documentary Film Festival and it can also be seen at The Atlantic. . .   Read More

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