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Blog Archive for the ‘Archives’ Category

Retrocomputing Brings Warhol’s Lost Digital Art Back to Life

by Catherine Borgeson on May 16th, 02014

In 01985, Andy Warhol used an Amiga 1000 personal computer and the GraphiCraft software to create a series of digital works. Warhol’s early computer artworks are now viewable after 30 years of dormancy.
Commodore International commissioned Warhol to appear at the product launch and produce a few public pieces showing off the Amiga’s. . .   Read More

Laura Welcher Speaks at Contemporary Jewish Museum This Sunday

by Charlotte Hajer on February 13th, 02014

How do public archives, as collections of cultural artifacts, shape our collective memory? And how is this changing as new digital tools make it ever easier for scholars and artists to access these repositories?
This Sunday, Long Now’s Laura Welcher joins a group of archivists and artists to discuss these questions and more at. . .   Read More

Reviving and Restoring Lost Sounds

by Catherine Borgeson on December 26th, 02013

In 02008 Kevin Kelly called for movage (as opposed to storage) as the only way to archive digital information:

“Proper movage means transferring the material to current platforms on a regular basis— that is, before the old platform completely dies, and it becomes hard to do. This movic rythym of refreshing content should be as. . .   Read More

The Cure for Broken Links and Dead Dot-Coms

by Catherine Borgeson on November 1st, 02013

“The Internet echoes with the empty spaces where data used to be.”
– Alexis Rossi from the Wayback Machine

The Internet Archive recently unveiled a new plan to fix broken links utilizing the Wayback Machine.
The Wayback Machine provides digital captures of URLs to create stable access to websites that otherwise might vanish. The service initially. . .   Read More

Neil Gaiman on Libraries and the Future

by Austin Brown on October 29th, 02013

Books connect our future and our past, teaching us about what came before and encouraging us to imagine what might yet be. Because of this, reading and libraries remain essential even in our technological and multimedia future, Neil Gaiman recently insisted in a lecture for London’s The Reading Agency:
Fiction can show you a. . .   Read More

Art & The Art of Archiving at New York’s New Museum

by Charlotte Hajer on August 12th, 02013

From July 17 to September 8 of this year, the New Museum on Manhattan’s Lower East Side is hosting XFR STN (read ‘transfer station’), an “open-door artist-centered media archiving project.”
A collaborative effort by artists for artists, XFR STN is essentially a preservation and migration service for artwork created with or on. . .   Read More

A New Dimension (or Two?) for Long-Term Data Storage

by Charlotte Hajer on July 26th, 02013

A group of scientists at the University of Southampton is pushing the frontier of long-term data storage technology to a new level. At a recent Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics in San José, the researchers announced their success at recording data in quartz glass by using a femtosecond laser.

A femtosecond, or ultrafast. . .   Read More

10 Petabytes and Growing: The Internet Archive

by Austin Brown on June 3rd, 02013

The Internet Archive seeks to offer universal access to all knowledge.  Jonathan Minard and Deepspeed Media recently created Archive, a short documentary exploring how they’re slowly but steadily achieving this ambitious goal.

Internet Archive from Deepspeed media on Vimeo. . .   Read More

The Digital Public Library of America

by Charlotte Hajer on April 26th, 02013

A digital library that makes published material available to anyone with an internet connection, free of charge: a realistic possibility, or a utopian fantasy?

Last April, a contributor to the MIT Technology review questioned whether it could be done: if Google Books had become mired in legal battles with US copyright law, would anyone else. . .   Read More

Almost half of the world’s languages are endangered

by Austin Brown on April 17th, 02013

On the blog of Long Now’s Rosetta Project, intern Karin Wiecha describes the recently published findings of a major linguistics research effort:
ELCat uses the metaphor of biodiversity to illustrate the gravity of the loss of an entire language family: If we compare the extinction of a language to the extinction of an animal. . .   Read More