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Blog Archive for the ‘Digital Dark Age’ Category

TimesMachine: “All the News That Was Fit to Print”

by Austin Brown on February 13th, 02013

If you’re a fan of this video showing a years’ worth of front pages for NYTimes.com, or the Way Back Machine, which allows you to browse the internet of the past, you might also love a project released by the New York Times today: The TimesMachine.
TimesMachine can take you back to any. . .   Read More

Preserving Virtual Worlds

by Catherine Borgeson on November 1st, 02012

“This is our history, and just a handful of people are saving it.”
— PixelVixen707, screen name of “Rachael Webster,” a fictional character in the alternate reality game Personal Effects: Dark Art

Virtual games are becoming cultural artifacts. Yes, they are commodities, (the global market for video games is forecast to hit $82 billion by 02017. . .   Read More

Decoding Long-Term Data Storage

by Charlotte Hajer on October 12th, 02012

If human societies are founded on the accumulation of knowledge through the ages, then the long-term transmission of information must be the cornerstone of a durable civilization. And as we accelerate ever more rapidly in our expansion of knowledge and technological capability, the development of durable storage methods becomes ever more important.

In the. . .   Read More

Decaying Web

by Alexander Rose - Twitter: @zander on September 30th, 02012

 

Tom Chatfield from BBC online writes about the newest flavor of the digital dark age…  Lost tweets and social media:
On January 28 2011, three days into the fierce protests that would eventually oust the Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, a Twitter user called Farrah posted a link to a picture that supposedly showed an. . .   Read More

Cultural Memories in the Digital World

by Charlotte Hajer on September 19th, 02012

A book is much more than a collection of information. It is also a physical object, and this materiality plays an important role in shaping the way we relate to literature. Think of how the pages of your favorite story feel between your fingers, and the way its spine creases as you immerse yourself further. . .   Read More

Storing Digital Data in DNA

by Laura Welcher on August 16th, 02012

Reported in Science today, scientists George Church, Yuan Gao and Sriram Kosuri report that they have written a 5.27-megabit “book” in DNA – encoding far more digital data in DNA than has ever been achieved.

Writing messages in DNA was first demonstrated in 1988, and the largest amount of data written in DNA previously. . .   Read More

Solving the Pioneer Anomaly With Magnetic Tapes and Punch Cards

by Charlotte Hajer on July 27th, 02012

You may dream of freaky new physics, but sometimes freaky old physics is all you need. (New York Times)
Slava G. Turyshev, an expert on gravity at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, recently proved that the tried and true theories of Einsteinian physics are as powerful as ever – and he used technology from the 01970s. . .   Read More

Rosetta, A Documentary by Scott Oller

by Austin Brown on July 24th, 02012

The Rosetta Project was created to begin the work of filling Long Now’s 10,000 Year Library and in 02011 student filmmaker Scott Oller offered to help tell the story of the project’s aspirations and achievements. This short documentary, Oller’s senior thesis, was shot over the course of several weeks in the. . .   Read More

Remembering our Right to Remember

by Charlotte Hajer on July 23rd, 02012

In 01994, The Economist first launched its very own website. Before long, America Online pronounced it one of the world’s best news sites, and numerous readers depended on it for their updates on current events.

Yet 18 years later, this once valued page is nowhere to be found. (The Wayback Machine’s records only. . .   Read More

What could take the internet down?

by Austin Brown on July 12th, 02012

In April 02010, Dr. David Eagleman addressed the Seminars About Long-term Thinking with a lecture called “Six Steps to Avert the Collapse of Civilization.”

Central to Dr. Eagleman’s proposal for a resilient global society was the internet. As a high-volume, distributed communication system, the net offers new ways to contain disease, back. . .   Read More