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Blog Archive for the ‘Futures’ Category

Stewart Brand – “Cities And Time”

by Simone Davalos on April 11th, 02005

A world made of cities

Cities are the human organizations with the greatest longevity but also the fastest rate of change. Just now the world is going massively and unstoppably urban (governments everywhere are trying to stop it, with zero success). In a globalized world, city states are re-emerging as a dominant economic player. . .   Read More

Ken Dychtwald – The Consequences Of Human Life Extension”

by Stewart Brand on December 6th, 02004

What long life means

Ken Dychtwald gave a terrific talk Friday evening to a standing-room audience on “The Consequences of Human Life Extension.”

The growing—and soon overwhelming—prevalence of the old in developed nations is leading to a “new old.” Ken described meeting a bright-eyed apparent 70-year-old who talked about. . .   Read More

Michael West – “The Prospects of Human Life Extension”

by Stewart Brand on November 15th, 02004

Ever longer life

Our germline cells (eggs and sperm) are already immortal. What if the rest of the cells of our body could acquire the same ability? Tissue by tissue, one degenerative disease after another, it could gradually happen in the course of one or two human generations. When it does happen, what we mean. . .   Read More

Bruce Sterling – “The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole”

by Stewart Brand on June 14th, 02004

Your future as a black hole

One reason lots of people don’t want to think long term these days is because technology keeps accelerating so rapidly, we assume the world will become unrecognizable in a few years and then move on to unimaginable. Long-term thinking must be either impossible or irrelevant.

The commonest. . .   Read More

Yucca Mountain’s Future

by Peter Schwartz on March 3rd, 02002

This article was written by Peter Schwartz for Red Herring’s 02002 Scenarios issue. This is the original un-edited piece.

Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada is more a ridge than a mountain. It slowly rises from a height of four thousand feet to six thousand feet along its’ length of six miles. On February. . .   Read More

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