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Blog Archive for the ‘Long-term Thinking’ Category

Visualization of 5,000 Years of War

by Andrew Warner on March 16th, 02016

1100Lab has developed a visualization mapping all of the battles in Wikipedia in the last 5,000 years. Their blog details how they compiled the data, as well as other projects by the Netherlands based research and development firm. . .   Read More

Edge Question 02016

by Andrew Warner on January 12th, 02016

It’s been an annual tradition since 01998: with a new year comes a new Edge question. Every January, John Brockman presents the members of his online salon with a question that elicits discussion about some of the biggest intellectual and scientific issues of our time. Previous iterations have included prompts such as “What should we […]

Growing a forest of 5000 year trees

by Bryan Campen - Twitter: @bryancampen on December 11th, 02015

This month, your contributions to The Long Now Foundation support the creation of the Fund of the Long Now. We will leverage this fund, through centuries of interest and investments, to help make Long Now a truly long-term institution.

Supporters of the fund are receiving a limited edition Bristlecone Pine Tree Kit (pictured above. . .   Read More

Sweden’s Minister of the Future

by Andrew Warner on December 8th, 02015

Sweden’s Minister of the Future, Kristina Persson, has been tasked with expanding the temporal horizons of government plans and “constantly remind others to include the long-term in the decision making process.”
The idea behind the creation of such a ministry was a simple one: for Sweden to remain competitive tomorrow, it might, unfortunately. . .   Read More

Philip Tetlock, “All It Takes to Improve Forecasting is: KEEP SCORE”

by Andrew Warner on November 30th, 02015

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Superforecasting
Monday November 23, 02015 – San Francisco

Audio is up on the Tetlock Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
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All it takes to improve forecasting is KEEP SCORE – a summary by Stewart Brand
Will. . .   Read More

The Artangel Longplayer Letters: Manuel Arriaga writes to Giles Fraser

by Andrew Warner on November 18th, 02015

In May, John Burnside  wrote a letter to Manuel Arriga as part of the Artangel Longplayer Letters series. The series is a relay-style correspondence: The first letter was written by Brian Eno to Nassim Taleb. Nassim Taleb then wrote to Stewart Brand, and Stewart wrote to Esther Dyson, who wrote to Carne Ross, who. . .   Read More

Steven Johnson takes a Long Now Perspective on the Superintelligence Threat

by Andrew Warner on November 12th, 02015

Steven Johnson, former Seminar speaker & author of How We Got to Now, recently wrote on the dangers of A.I. on his blog “How We Got To Next”. He discusses evolutionary software, the existential threat of A.I., before concluding with a meditation of long-term thinking and The Long Now Foundation:
One of. . .   Read More

James Fallows gives update to his “Civilization’s Infrastructure” Seminar

by Andrew Warner on November 5th, 02015

We under-imagine benefits and over-imagine problems with civilian infrastructure projects, yet we do the opposite with military infrastructure-scale weapons systems.  Both behaviors defy reason and cause harm.
— Stewart Brand
James Fallows recently wrote a piece for the Atlantic describing common bias in dealing with military infrastructure vs. public infrastructure, expanding on the. . .   Read More

10,000 Years of Oral Narrative

by Charlotte Hajer on October 29th, 02015

Just off the coast of Australia, a few miles west of Perth, lie three small limestone islands. Today they’re a popular destination for boat trips and air taxis, but a local Aboriginal tribe tells stories of a time when these three isles were connected to the mainland by lush forest. One day, the stories. . .   Read More

Ancient Venture Capitalism and its Lessons for the Modern Economy

by Charlotte Hajer on September 24th, 02015

Our understanding of ancient civilizations can be spotty. Because not all cultural artifacts withstand the test of time, we have to piece together our portraits of these societies with partial clues, making inferences where needed to cover gaps in the archaeological record.
But one of these clues offers a remarkably detailed picture of economic life. . .   Read More