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Blog Archive for the ‘Psychology’ Category

Alison Gopnik on the Long-term Future of AI

by Ahmed Kabil on April 9th, 02019

Alison Gopnik, a professor of psychology and philosophy at UC-Berkeley, believes that the changes AI will bring to humanity will be profound, but that we won’t notice them.

From John Brockman’s Long Now Seminar “Possible Minds. . .   Read More

Walter Mischel, “Thinking Hot and Cool”

by Andrew Warner on May 16th, 02016

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control
Monday May 2, 02016 – San Francisco

Video is up on the Mischel Seminar page.
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Audio is up on the Mischel Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
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Thinking hot. . .   Read More

The Artangel Longplayer Letters: Manuel Arriaga writes to Giles Fraser

by Andrew Warner on November 18th, 02015

In May, John Burnside  wrote a letter to Manuel Arriga as part of the Artangel Longplayer Letters series. The series is a relay-style correspondence: The first letter was written by Brian Eno to Nassim Taleb. Nassim Taleb then wrote to Stewart Brand, and Stewart wrote to Esther Dyson, who wrote to Carne Ross, who. . .   Read More

Daniel Kahneman: Thinking Fast and Slow — A Seminar Flashback

by Mikl Em on August 16th, 02014

In August 02013 Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman spoke for Long Now about two types of thinking he’s identified and their implications. The pioneer of behavioral economics gave an insightful and humor-filled presentation on how we think and make decisions. Kahneman contrasted his pessimism with Stewart Brand’s characteristic optimism in their. . .   Read More

The Artangel Longplayer Letters: Esther Dyson writes to Carne Ross

by Andrew Warner on April 10th, 02014

In November, Long Now co-founder Stewart Brand wrote a letter to Long Now board member Esther Dyson as part of the Artangel Longplayer Letters series. The series is a relay-style correspondence: The first letter was written by Brian Eno to Taleb. Taleb then wrote to Stewart Brand, and Stewart wrote to Esther Dyson. . .   Read More

Human Self-Interest and the Problem of Solving Long-Term Issues

by Charlotte Hajer on November 8th, 02013

We are a selfish, short-sighted lot. As many a game theory experiment has shown, we simply aren’t as motivated by the promise of collective future benefits as we are by the gratification of instant private rewards.

A group of researchers based at NYU now argues that this kind of self-interest can throw. . .   Read More

Daniel Kahneman, “On Taking Thought”

by Austin Brown on August 29th, 02013

This lecture was presented as part of The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking.

Thinking Fast and Slow
Tuesday August 13, 02013 – San Francisco
 

Video is up on the Kahneman Seminar page for Members.
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Audio is up on the Kahneman Seminar page, or you can subscribe to our podcast.
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On. . .   Read More

Daniel Kahneman Seminar Primer

by Andrew Warner on August 6th, 02013

“Thinking Fast and Slow”
Tuesday August 13, 02013 at the Marines Memorial Theater, San Francisco

Daniel Kahneman is one of the world’s foremost psychologist. Back in the early 1970s, Kahneman and his research partner, Amos Tversky, “set out to dismantle an entity long dear to economic theorists: that arch-rational decision maker known as. . .   Read More

Being Human Conference 02013

by Austin Brown on June 21st, 02013

On September 28, 02013, the second Being Human conference will he held at the Nourse Theater in San Francisco. With talks by neuroscientists, philosophers, anthropologists and psychologists, this day-long event seeks to probe science’s developing picture of what it means to be human. As the organizers put it,

For most of human history. . .   Read More

Whole Earth Psychology

by Charlotte Hajer on April 8th, 02013

Anyone who has traveled abroad or simply eaten at the ethnic restaurant around the corner will appreciate the richness of cross-cultural diversity our world has to offer. Each part of the world has its own cuisine, its own social organization, its own religious practices, and its own fashions. Cognitive research has always assumed that. . .   Read More