Support Long-term Thinking
Support Long-term Thinking

Genetically Engineered Moths a Success in Cornell Crop Protection Study

by Alice Riddell on February 10th, 02020

A recent article in phys.org reports on a newly-published study on the use of genetically engineered moths to increase crop protection. The Cornell study documents the successful application and release of self-limiting, genetically engineered diamondback moths to fields of brassica crops.  “The diamondback moth, also known as Plutella xylostella, is highly . . .   Read More

Podcast: The Art and Science of Deep Time: Conceiving the Inconceivable in the 19th Century | Caroline Winterer

by Ahmed Kabil on February 7th, 02020

The ambition to think on the scale of thousands, millions, even billion of years emerged in the 19th century. Historian and author Caroline Winterer chronicles how the concept of “deep time” has inspired and puzzled thinkers in cognitive science, art, geology (and elsewhere) to become one of the most 
influential ideas of . . .   Read More

A Useful Primer for Complexity Science

by Alice Riddell on February 6th, 02020

Complexity Explained is a new project that distills key aspects of complexity science, also known as complex science systems, into an easy-to-digest, interactive visual explainer. The explainer is also available as a free booklet, downloadable at this link. . .   Read More

Podcast: 24/6: The Power of Unplugging One Day A Week | Tiffany Shlain

by Ahmed Kabil on February 3rd, 02020

As the world is becoming more technologically connected, finding time for oneself and face-to-face connections is becoming increasingly difficult.  Many of our talks at Long Now have aimed to help expand our collective now by centuries or even millennia, but what about our personal present?  Tiffany . . .   Read More

New Images of the Sun Captured by Impressive New Telescope in Hawaii

by Alice Riddell on January 31st, 02020

In a piece for The New York Times, Dennis Overbye describes the remarkable images of the sun captured by the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii. Our closest star, never before seen in such detail, now resembles a “boiling pot of popcorn” thanks to the 158 inches . . .   Read More

Podcast: Long-term Thinking in a Distracted World | Bina Venkataraman

by Ahmed Kabil on January 29th, 02020

What does practical long-term thinking look like? Bina Venkataraman’s new book, The Optimist’s Telescope: Thinking Ahead in a Reckless Age, brings this abstract question to life. Through a series of anecdotes and case studies that draw from her background in public policy, climate change strategy, and journalism, Venkataraman explores . . .   Read More

The History of Humanity: An Immersive Art Installation

by Alice Riddell on January 23rd, 02020

Sara Barnes has recently written a piece for My Modern Met detailing an immersive art installation, which explores human history through a sculptural narrative detailing humanity’s greatest paradigm shifts. The installation, entitled Memory Palaces, was created by artist and stage designer Es Devlin, as a chronological landscape of the evolution of human . . .   Read More

Long Quotes: Martin Luther King

by Ahmed Kabil on January 20th, 02020

The Past and Future of the Earth’s Oldest Trees

by Ahmed Kabil on January 14th, 02020

Alex Ross has written a moving tribute to Long Now’s unofficial mascot, the bristlecone pine, in The New Yorker. What is most astonishing about Pinus longaeva is not the age of any single organism but the collective oldness and otherness of its entire community. No two super-elderly trees look alike, to . . .   Read More

A Prescient Prediction from a Reader of Seventeen Magazine

by Ahmed Kabil on January 10th, 02020

In 02000, Seventeen magazine asked its readers to send in predictions about the year 02020. Over a decade before the founding of Revive & Restore, Tiffany Ann Ruter of Jacksonville, Florida had this to say: I predict that the technology that already lets us clone live species, such as mice and sheep, and is . . .   Read More